MG-Rover.org Forums banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, apologies if this has been posted before, but where can I find simple to follow instructions on how to replace my rear brake pads (apart from a Haynes manual)? Do I need the wear sensor too? Any help or advice would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
You can find them from the 'other' site, to help you here is a quick how to.

Lossen road wheel bots
Jack rear of car up and support on stands
Remove wheels
get 13mm spanner (box spanner ideally) and remove the two caliper bolts. (2 per caliper)
withdraw caliper from disc.
remove old pads (may need prising out with a screw driver)
clamp piston back in to caliper (use a clamp or lever with a large screw driver)
apply copper grease to new pads and generally clean up the caliper
fit new pads
fit caliper back and tighten two 13mm bolts uber tight.

I know it seems easy, but it really is quite straight forward and as long as you don't come across any problems you can have the whole lot done in 2 hours working methodically

Welcome btw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Many thanks for the advice.

Daft question I suspect, but do I need a wear sensor for each side of the car? I've seen them for £10 each. Is this a reasonable price?

Cheers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,505 Posts
Many thanks for the advice.

Daft question I suspect, but do I need a wear sensor for each side of the car? I've seen them for £10 each. Is this a reasonable price?

Cheers.
Only one required for each end of the car. And they are different parts for front/back. One's got a longer lead on it I think but dont know which one.

You should be able to get them on E Bay as a pair (front and back) for about £15. Then your ready for the fronts when needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
You might find that your 13mm spanner is a 7mm allen key fitting instead , they are on my car! , also 2hours might be stretching it ,I took 1.15 and thought I was taking my time so there were no mistakes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Mate, this is 2007, not 1912. You are advisng winding the calipers on a car with ABS (and clamping the line), this should NOT be done. pushing the piston back in will not fold the seals in any direction and their is certainly no need to release the cap although you can do so if you really want to. Any modern day car that needs to have its brakes bled from a simple pad change should not be on the roads IME.

Also, Carlosg, you are describing the Caliper Pin removal, not the caliper removal. I'd run in the opposite direction if my calipers were mounted with 7mm Allen bolts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
It would appear then that my 33 years of training and experience as a mechanic are of no consequence then.
Sorry to contradict but it can, does and has happened, even to experienced mechanics who take this shortcut to earn their bonus.
You can get away with it maybe 95 times out of a hundred which is great if you're one of the 95.
Removing the cap:
Allows the air above the fluid to vent faster than normal preventing backpressure which makes pushing the piston back harder.
Preventing this backpressure also lowers this risk of the seals folding back. Consider this; air is compressible, with the cap on the air vents vey slowly as the pressure builds up and is felt on one side of the seal. As the piston is pushed back fluid pressure builds on the other side, eventually they equalise and pushing the piston back becomes harder so more pressure is exerted to the extent it exceeds the pressure on the other side of the seals-result seals fold back.
As for the ABS it is not affected by this operation.
1912 or 2007 matters not my friend.
CJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,706 Posts
Changing pads

Sorry, why push dirty fluid from the caliper back into the system.
Much easier to loosen bleed nipple on caliper and gently push piston back, expelling the dirty fluid. I nip up the bleed nipple while the last of the fluid is escaping.
Push the piston back until it is flush (or nearly so) with the caliper. This ensures adequate clearance for the new pads.
You will find when finished the brake pedal needs a couple of pumps until you have full pedal. Job done without any further bleeding required, unless, of course, you wish to push some more fresh fluid out of the bleed nipple to flush pipes.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top