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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I remember a really helpful thread of these but can't find it now. [three similar threads have appeared but they are "model specific"...]

Judging by driving yesterday:

  • Don't drive too fast - you don't know if the next corner may be covered with ice.
  • If you see brakelights / red traffic lights a long way ahead, brake gently yourself in case.
  • Large vans (Sprinter size) are driving particularly aggressively - very fast, tailgating, undertaking. Seasonal workers unused to the vehicle/route under time pressure, perhaps?
  • Audis [and yellow cars - my observations] cutting across lanes and across unbroken white lines (slippery)
  • Small Fabia-type cars driving along at say 50 when the lorries are doing 60 - dangerous!

Presume you might be driving on marbles and you can't be wrong...

...and be careful out there! :lol:
 

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Worth thinking of places on the road where there are likely to be areas of reduced grip as it's obviously that much more imporant in this weather and some don't seem to realise it. Roundabouts and junctions are lethal - slow down in great advance rather than go drifting into a road after realising you cant stop after you've approached at normal speed, exits to petrol stations, shaded areas on the road from trees (microclimates and all) manhole covers, overbraiding, expansion joints on bridges (all very slippery), the bridge themselves, especially on motorways as they tend to freeze much more easily as there is no ground insulation as present on the motorway, concrete road surfaces, white lines etc.

I remember a few years ago somone told me about a fella who was driving and RX7. he caught a tyre on christmas day/eve or thereabouts, on some overbraiding on an A road. the rear end stepped out, he corrected it, then hit another car head on. that stuff can be one of the most slippery surfaces when cold, greasy and icy.. the passenger was practically a vegetable afterwards, and the innocent driver of the other car with some very long term injuries.

also worth remembering that your car may well loose traction on white lines when overtaking, again particularly when icy or wet, so it's always better the apply power after you've switched lanes, which of course means planning ahead for overtaking.. A lot of the logic to motorcycle riding should be applied to car driving in the conditions - the effects effecting grip may not always be so bad as on a motorcycle, but they're there nonetheless..
 

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At this time of year, I always recall the mantra of my instructor at Arjeplog test centre:

'High gear, low revs. As slow as possible and as fast as necessary'

It's always served me well.
 

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rover_400_95_99
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when everyone else is bumper to bumper queing up on a duel carriageway that goes down a very very steep and curving bank in very heavy snow DO NOT be the fool who decides to fly down the empty outside lane which is 4 inches thick of snow or you will come off cause an accident and close the road................................. oh wait a minute that did happen on saturday while i was on my way to work causeing me to be unable to attend and losing me an attendance bonus:slap:
hope the driver was ok and learned a very important lesson.
 

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rover_45
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Quite simply, a 1 tonne car on ice is going to struggle, so don't think you can master it and be able to control whatever happens.

Driving on ice is compeltely different to driving on tarmac, I learnt the hard way crashing into the lil wall in Feb :(
 

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mg_zt_t
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Worth thinking of places on the road where there are likely to be areas of reduced grip as it's obviously that much more imporant in this weather and some don't seem to realise it. Roundabouts and junctions are lethal - slow down in great advance rather than go drifting into a road after realising you cant stop after you've approached at normal speed, exits to petrol stations, shaded areas on the road from trees (microclimates and all) manhole covers, overbraiding, expansion joints on bridges (all very slippery), the bridge themselves, especially on motorways as they tend to freeze much more easily as there is no ground insulation as present on the motorway, concrete road surfaces, white lines etc.

I remember a few years ago somone told me about a fella who was driving and RX7. he caught a tyre on christmas day/eve or thereabouts, on some overbraiding on an A road. the rear end stepped out, he corrected it, then hit another car head on. that stuff can be one of the most slippery surfaces when cold, greasy and icy.. the passenger was practically a vegetable afterwards, and the innocent driver of the other car with some very long term injuries.

also worth remembering that your car may well loose traction on white lines when overtaking, again particularly when icy or wet, so it's always better the apply power after you've switched lanes, which of course means planning ahead for overtaking.. A lot of the logic to motorcycle riding should be applied to car driving in the conditions - the effects effecting grip may not always be so bad as on a motorcycle, but they're there nonetheless..
Fine post.... Lots of sound stuff there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
There was more snow overnight - a tiny amount which froze solid. So, based on my observations:

1) If a junction looks icy, be ready to stop before the ice.

2) If you can see it is definitely safe to enter the junction, keep going gently over the ice (don't stop on it, you may not be able to restart) (though bear in mind you'll not be able to emergency stop, come to a gentle halt before the junction if in doubt)

3) Gently does it, don't expect that jamming on the brakes at the last minute will do anything.

4) If jamming on the brakes at the last minute did not do anything and you skidded, then putting your foot down for a quick getaway is a really stupid thing to do. :doh:

NB there is another "winter driving tips" thread in "bubble rap":

http://forums.mg-rover.org/showthread.php?t=337503
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I note that a guest is reading this, so I'll post again for community benefit: :grouphug:

After overnight snow, the roads got slippery again and where snow has melted, then frozen, there is black ice.

White vans are driving most carefully round the junctions but small hatches are taking them too fast.

I have noticed a Clio and a Polo lose control momentarily on the junction. Worst was a Saxo (yes, evidently there's still one on the road) with Lexus rearlights which turned into the junction but the whole car kept going sideways. It then accelerated up the road after some wheel-skidding(!) :slap:

Beware 1) that you have to drive differently and 2) that certain classes of driver are clearly representing an extra risk to us...
 
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