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Normally a question more appropriate to a 4WD than a roadster, but it floods around here and I'd like to know what the lowest bits of the car are at risk from driving through water.

Obviously I've driven through the flooding here without apparent problem (very slowly - following a landy - wish I'd seen the look on his face! Being followed by a TF). I'm also figuring that since the engine is mid mounted, it's likely to be safe (due to the bow wave created at the front), but what at the fronts at risk?

Paul
 

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mgf
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Exhaust is the lowest point where water can enter the engine. Unless you have an aftermarket air filter that is. Standard air intake is 1/3 the way up the rear engine/boot compartment wall so is pretty out of the way.

If water comes above the door cills there is a very good chance they will leak into the cabin, likewise if flood water gets through the side air intakes then there is a good chance of shorting out the alternator.

Speaking of shorts, the battery is the only vulnerable thing i can think of at the front, this as you know is fairly high up - i feel that if the water is high enough to short the battery you would have had other problems before this.
 

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Scarlet Fever said:
Exhaust is the lowest point where water can enter the engine. Unless you have an aftermarket air filter that is. Standard air intake is 3/4 the way up the rear engine/boot compartment wall so is pretty out of the way.
So looks like we TF/F ers are in quite good shape - I gather a number of front engined cars have the air intake low down at the front? Exhaust isn't an issue provided you keep the engine revs up.

thanks
Paul
 

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I placed an order for a Supersports when it was black, they eventually refunded my deposit :(

Anyway, to complete the set, here it is in chromaflare green...
 

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Not quite sure where the cat is, I haven't had a look. But isn't normally quite low and at risk when going through water?
 

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Alloys:

Original ones (on the Red version of the Supersports) were one offs and not speed rated (shame!)

Later alloys were split rims and different sizes front to rear - when i last saw them they were looking a bit worse for wear and in need of some TLC - the bolt heads particularly were pretty rusty :(

Cat:

The catalyst is one of the lowest points of the car, but it is sealed from the elements both ends by being part of the exhaust system so isn't unduely affected by wading. If you let water into the tailpipe finishers, enough to fill the rear silencer box, then there is a possibility of water getting inside the cat and damaging the matrix - as i mentioned originally, the tailpipes are the lowest 'entry' point to the engine from a water point of view. Keeping the revs high when fording will prevent water getting into the exhaust system (this is common fording knowledge). A picture of the cat can be found >> here <<
 

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I've driven my MGF through a good 6 inches or so quite a few times now - when I lived up in Ongar the River Roding had a tendancy to flood if someone spat in it.

Never had a problem anyway!
 

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Normally a question more appropriate to a 4WD than a roadster, but it floods around here and I'd like to know what the lowest bits of the car are at risk from driving through water.

Obviously I've driven through the flooding here without apparent problem (very slowly - following a landy - wish I'd seen the look on his face! Being followed by a TF). I'm also figuring that since the engine is mid mounted, it's likely to be safe (due to the bow wave created at the front), but what at the fronts at risk?

Paul
Paul.
I am on my second Defender and live by the canal and used to our road flooding.

I was by today's flood and I measured the height of the air intake in front of the rear wheels on a friend's MGF at 15".
The water was 8" so I said carry on but slow. Unfortunately he did but in second gear creating wash in front of the wheels.

No problem this time but I suggested 1st gear next time. On his return he trickled though in 1st and looked very safe.

The problem with too fast is you have no control of where the water is going and at high pressure. Go slow and you can stop and retreat if you are worried.

I hope that helps. Regards Michael
 
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