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i was just wondering why a v4 engine configoration has never been developed since u can obviously get v6, v8, v10 and v12 configorations why hasnt a v4 been developed as it is an even number so it could in theory be done???

xx
 

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V6/V8/V10/V12's only exist because there's no room to have all the cylinders in-line. 6 is the most you can feasibly get in-line. In-line 4's are commonplace simply because theres no need for a V4
 

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I think the main problem with the V4 is trying to balance them, a lot of engineering for little gain.
 

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ford used V4 engines in the 1960's and 70's. this was the main petrol engine for the transit range, as they needed a small engine compartment, to maximise load space within the length.

the V4 engine was replaced by the "pinto" inline 4 in 1978.
 

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Originally Posted by tanvir: V6/V8/V10/V12's only exist because there's no room to have all the cylinders in-line. 6 is the most you can feasibly get in-line.
I think the late Frederick Duesenberg might have taken issue with that.
 

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A V4 has to cost more than an in-line 4 because of the more complex block and two cylinder heads, gaskets, inlet/exhaust manifolds etc. Since 4 pots tend to go into smaller, cheaper cars the extra cost can't (usually) be justified.

As mentioned, sometimes the packaging advantages make a V configuation desirable despite the cost.

OTOH a straight 6 is perfectly balanced, and therefore inherently smoother.
 

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ford used V4 engines in the 1960's and 70's. this was the main petrol engine for the transit range, as they needed a small engine compartment, to maximise load space within the length.

the V4 engine was replaced by the "pinto" inline 4 in 1978.
Ford also used the V4 in cars at the same time.
 

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The V4 configuration is a very popular engine in the Honda motorcycle range.
They even fit it with there V-tec system! Sound good too, as do all 'V' engines.
 

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ford used V4 engines in the 1960's and 70's. this was the main petrol engine for the transit range, as they needed a small engine compartment, to maximise load space within the length.

the V4 engine was replaced by the "pinto" inline 4 in 1978.
I remeber my sister had a Transit with a V4, it also went in the Ford Corsair
and the Saab 95 and 96, can't remember if it was 1600 or 2 litre.
 

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Why do 'V' configurations make a different sound than inline ones and 'flat/boxer' ones? Eg. an inline 4 sounds half as good as a flat 4? At least to my ears
 

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I don't know, never heard a V4, tough I've heard flat 4s and inline 4s. Not really impressive.
But an inline 6 sounds better than V6 and/or boxer 6 for me.
V8s and V12s better, but an F1 V10 reving (preferably at 20 000+ RPMs) is for me the best music. (FIA [email protected][email protected]**$, killing such masterpieces)
 

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I drove a Ford Corsair back in the late 1960s ~ it had a V4 engine. Smart, stylish and elegant looking car for the time. Much preferrd it to the more popular Cortina. I think I spotted a pristine example on one of the recent "Life on Mars" episodes. The configuration is popular in motorcycles ... or, was for a time.

I have never liked the sound made by a flat four be it a VW Beetle or Subaru. Much prefer the sound of my 4-in-line T16 which has a fine induction sound ~ most turbocharged cars do not have a nice 'clear throated' exhaust note...

Anyone who watched and listened to Motor Sports prior to around the time 'cans' became compulsory on racing motorcycles will remenber what a 'clear throated' normally aspirated racing engine can sound like ... superb. Each cylinder having its own individual exhaust pipe megaphone tuned to suit it perfectly.

Back then, I believe one of the three cylinder Honda 50cc Grand Prix engines revved at around 25,000 rpm and lapped the 37.75 Mountain Cicuit on the Isle of Man at around 80 mph. ..... 50cc ... what a sound! My favourites were the MV-Agusta, Gilera and Honda multi cylinder bikes each cylinder having its own tuned megaphone exhaust. 1-2-3-4-5-6 and Moto Guzzi even had a 500cc V8 machine!

I believe the Honda F1 car of the mid 1960 was a flat twelve of 1500cc ~ each cylinder with its own individula exhaust pipe. A fantastic sound.

Don't know how true this story is, but a Japanes Professor I knew ( who was also an English speaking Broadcaster on the Japanese equivalent of the BBC ) once told me that Soichiro Honda would wander down into the area where the racing engines were on a test bed and listen to the exhaust notes the engines made. Then, he would instruct his staff to make some adjustment to the engine and this usually resulted in an improvement in the engine's performance. Who needs computers? ...:) Probably why those early multi cylindered Grand Prix bikes and cars sounded so superb!

Modern racing cars and bikes sound good but, never sound anywhere near as nice as those older efforts ... to my ears.

Did I mention the Bread Van Ferrari ? ... finest sports car sound ever!
 

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I had a V4 Saab a long while ago, the 95 with free wheeling (to cancel engine breaking). They sounded rougher than the in-line I always thought, and were not all that reliable either.
 

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Ford used a V4 in the early 1970's Transit's with various capacities.
1.7 and 2 litre spring to mind, but the only advantage would appear to be that they were a fairly compact engine if you had a small engine bay.
 

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In a previous job, I had the task of mowing grass every week with a National Triple Gang mower fitted with a Briggs and Stratton 12hp V-Twin engine - sounded great when revved up :)
 

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My Dad had a Corsair and would always go on about how quick the V4 engine was. Are V4's more torquey than inline 4s, a bit like V8s?

I believe the Ford V4 is a common engine transplant for the rotary engine in Ro80s. I assume because of their compactness.
 

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Think V4 and you tend to think Ford. The GB Ford V4 was a bit of a rough old thing, and it weighed a ton, but it could be made to move along very nicely in 2-litre form.

But the best V4s were produced by Lancia. Remember the gorgeous Fulvia coupe? It used a very narrow angle V4 engine, so narrow that it was possible to use one casting for the cylinder head, that fitted over both banks of the V. A very smooth and powerful engine resulted. Lancia had a long history of producing narrow angle V4 engines, dating back to pre-war days.
 
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