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mg_tf
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Hello Richard,
Please excuse me if this appears harsh and critical, but are you really expecting to drive this car safely on an A road at 90 mph ( 30 mph over the legal limit or 20 over if A1M)? If so, then I fear you have bought the wrong car - even if every component is in factory fresh condition- unless you have driving skills beyond the norm.
I’m sure you will appreciate that these cars are front end light, so I trust your driving skills are indeed above average if you truly want to drive it like this.
I’m not saying there isn’t anything wrong with it, and if I were in your situation and expectation level, then I would most definitely be getting this professionally inspected without delay.
I can only apologise again for this Richard, but…
Kind regards,
Austin.
 

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Have I missed it, but I didn’t see the tyre brand and model the previous owner fitted for you?

F’s and TF’s are very ‘sensitive’ to tyre choice, but (as with all cars), please also don’t discount normal causes - for example: mismatched tyres on the same axle, tyre pressures, worn suspension components, tracking and balance faults etc
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Thanks Ian, pressure is something I've gotten use to checking now. All the tyres are exactly the same, but I'm thinking about what Chis said and the handbook suggests bigger on the back. Up to around 75 currently it fine, may stick with them for a year and see how it goes. Thanks again for you imputes. Richard.
 

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mg_tf
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Low profile tyres have a low side wall height compared with their width (low aspect ratio). They provide more precise handling than ordinary aspect ratio tyres as they are stiffer and don't twist/squirm under steering inputs/load as much as ordinary high aspect ratio tyres. My TF felt like it ran on rails compared to my previous car (which did not have low aspect ratio tyres).
The downside is they do not isolate you (or the alloys) from rough road surfaces well and I have dented one alloy and cracked another.
Folklore has it the TF was designed with a spare wheel under the bonnet in mind , but the spare became an option as Rover tried to squeeze as much money out of buyers as possible. If you don't have a spare, you could try a bag of sand (or similar) under the bonnet to get a heavier nose and see if that helps ;0)

Your overtaking experience might be due to 'tramlining'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Thanks buddy, I have a tyre in the front as spec. However could you just explain what is classes as low profile please? My walls are 40 what would that size have to be to be classes low profile? I'm asking for information now my friend, as I'll keep these for a while anyway. Thanks Richard.
 

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'06 MG ZR +120 (HQM) '04 MG ZR 105 (IAB)
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Defining a 'Low Profile' tyre is a little bit variable because the term simply refers to tyres with a lower aspect ratio than the usual found on most standard family saloon cars - thirty or forty years ago, most standard tyres on such cars would have had an aspect ratio somewhere in the region of 65 to 85 percent of the tyre width, so anything less than that was considered 'Low Profile'.

Nowadays, standard car tyres more often have an aspect ratio in the range of 50 to 60 percent of the tyre width, so you would probably regard any tyre with an aspect ratio below 50 as being low profile. Tyres with an aspect ratio of 35 or less would probably be termed 'Ultra-Low Profile' and mostly found on very high performance sports cars/sports saloons, high 'rich posers' type SUVs or on 'boy-racer' type old bangers. They will give superior handling, but a very harsh and uncomfortable ride (which we older drivers would almost certainly not entertain for very long!). The lower the profile, the higher the risk of tyre damage from potholes, debris and even speed humps which may lead to the outer layer of rubber becoming detached from the carcase causing dangerous blebs on the sidewall or the tread which can lead to the tyre bursting.

The standard sizes of tyres fitted to the MG ranges of cars were a good compromise between comfort and resistance to road damage versus the general extra grip and handling characteristics generally associated with 'sports' cars, so it is probably best to stick with the sizes given in the owners handbook unless you have a special reason for wanting to change.

When it comes to handling characteristics between different tyres of the same size, it will almost always come down to the quality of tyre fitted. The TF has become well known for not handling well unless one sticks to a reasonably small number of manufacturers tyres, and fitting outright budget tyres to any car will always give a marked reduction in almost all areas of a tyres performance (although the budget tyre 'fanbois' will argue the toss until the end of time, despite the ample evidence that most budget tyres fully deserve the 'ditchfinder' terminology that others usually attribute to them).
 

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The TF is designed to use low profile tyres but it is a fallacy that low profile tyres give better grip, just look at F1 wheels which are currently on 13 inch wheels and have massive sidewalls. F1 is being forced to go down the low profile route next year only because Pirelli want their race tyres to reflect the current fashion for low profile tyres not for any performance benefit.

On the subject of four wheel alignment you should always get it done at the same time that you have your new tyres fitted and NOT with your old tyres which may well have uneven wear and could give a false reading (hence the possibility of ending up with an offset steering wheel as mentioned in an earlier post).
 

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MGF's x 5 MGTF's x 6, Rover 620Ti & Cortina Mk3
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Run budgets on all my F's and TF;s and have never had an issue, but I think that is because of trial and error testing how far I can push them on bends and not try anything silly. So far I've only had the back end catch up with front on two occasions, one of the occasions was due to gravel on the road. The other was in my 160, the tyres on that remind me of my old bike in the 80's which had chinese Chen Shin tyres...gripped well in the dry but were lethal in the wet. The 160 is the only TF (and F) I've ever been able to wheelspin, even when not trying, they will be changed next MOT though as they are living on the limits :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Whilst the tyres are the correct size for the rear they are not for the front. Some people report no issues with this others report that it can make the car more likely to tram line (depending on the road surface).

Have you checked the tyre pressures?

Yes Steve, I'm doing the tyres every week, thank you, before a drive normally. As I mentioned I had those budget summer tyre on all four corners, all the same size, could I maybe buy two different quality tyres now for the front, leave the back (as they are the right size) and change them as funds become available?
 
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