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Discussion Starter #1
hi

i went to test drive a rover 100 today. had never driven one before, and am now convinced that it is far better to drive than an AX which i had also looked at. the only thing putting me off buying a 100 is the rusting rear wheel arches.

why do all the ones i have seen have rusty arches, and only the rear ones too? also how much would it be to get the arches replaced?

i didnt buy that car, despite it being otherwise mint, because it also had blown head gasket, because the expansion bottle was more like a jar of hellmans mayonaise, and there was mayo in the oil cap

he wanted £450 for it, as it was otherwise a very nice car.
 

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Yeah, be careful mate. They rot - badly.

Also check the area around the tailgate hinges - over time, the join between the rear panel and the roof litfs and water gets in, rotting the roof from inside out.

100's have the later K series block, which suffers badly from HGF too.
 

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Devonshire Dave said:
hi

i went to test drive a rover 100 today. had never driven one before, and am now convinced that it is far better to drive than an AX which i had also looked at. the only thing putting me off buying a 100 is the rusting rear wheel arches.

why do all the ones i have seen have rusty arches, and only the rear ones too? also how much would it be to get the arches replaced?
The wheel arches rust on all Metro, Maestro and Montego models, it's a combination of poor design and mainly poor maintenance. The rear wheel arches of any car will pick up mud and salt which sticks to the inside of the arch, the Metro, Maestro and Montego all have peculiar arch designs which seems to give this mud a better chance of sticking. Best bet is to find a good example and waxoyl like mad, and treat all the wheel arches to a good clean with the garden hose every week or so, especially over winter.
 

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My 1998 model has one rotten rear arch, but oddly enough the one on the other side is immaculate. If you get it early enough then it will just be a case of rub down and repaint; Worse case scenario is a new wheel arch welded on.

Driving experience is second to none for its class. For a car without PAS, the steering is incredibly light and sharp when on the move, and turn in is excellent, with only a little body roll.

Mayo in the coolant could mean anything, it is just mayo in the oil and on the dipstick you need to watch. My coolant tank is full of the stuff and an oily skin has developed on the top, but the coolant underneath is clean, and so far I have had no problems. It passed its compression test only last week, no problems.

Being an 8V also, the head won't need to be skimmed when it does go, but as with any K-Series car it is merely a matter of when, not if. If you get it early enough you can avoid some serious headaches; Keep an eye on that temp guage, and weekly checks to coolant and oil!

Mine is fast approaching 60,000 miles and that is usually the time when they go, I'll keep all of you posted on what happens.
 

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Liam Olf said:
My 1998 model has one rotten rear arch, but oddly enough the one on the other side is immaculate. If you get it early enough then it will just be a case of rub down and repaint; Worse case scenario is a new wheel arch welded on.

Driving experience is second to none for its class. For a car without PAS, the steering is incredibly light and sharp when on the move, and turn in is excellent, with only a little body roll.

Mayo in the coolant could mean anything, it is just mayo in the oil and on the dipstick you need to watch. My coolant tank is full of the stuff and an oily skin has developed on the top, but the coolant underneath is clean, and so far I have had no problems. It passed its compression test only last week, no problems.

Being an 8V also, the head won't need to be skimmed when it does go, but as with any K-Series car it is merely a matter of when, not if. If you get it early enough you can avoid some serious headaches; Keep an eye on that temp guage, and weekly checks to coolant and oil!

Mine is fast approaching 60,000 miles and that is usually the time when they go, I'll keep all of you posted on what happens.
Liam, keep an eye on yours mate.

Sounds like you have HGF, just it is not causing you problems - yet. If there is mayo or any rainbow effect in the coolant, it is oil contamination and could only be getting oil into the cooling system from one place. . . head gasket.

My mothers 214 started showing signs of rainbow effect at about 50K. Started getting exponentially worse at 60Kish and we bit the bullett and did it.

HTH.
 

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Brad Pitt said:
Liam, keep an eye on yours mate.

Sounds like you have HGF, just it is not causing you problems - yet. If there is mayo or any rainbow effect in the coolant, it is oil contamination and could only be getting oil into the cooling system from one place. . . head gasket.

My mothers 214 started showing signs of rainbow effect at about 50K. Started getting exponentially worse at 60Kish and we bit the bullett and did it.

HTH.
I don't know about a rainbow effect, but when I lift some of the skin off, the coolant is green. :err:

I'll have a closer look tommorow, I've been putting off draining the coolant away and retopping to see if it does it again, I'll have to do that soon.

What does the compression test prove exactly?
 

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Liam Olf said:
I don't know about a rainbow effect, but when I lift some of the skin off, the coolant is green. :err:

I'll have a closer look tommorow, I've been putting off draining the coolant away and retopping to see if it does it again, I'll have to do that soon.

What does the compression test prove exactly?
It just prooves the cylinders are compressing properly and no compression gas is leaking out of knackered valves, bad head gasket fire ring, etc.

Head gaskets can fail in many ways.

I would drain it and flush it thoroughly, according to procudure and then monitor it. It would be an easy job for you to do, if it needs doing.
 

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Well, the good news is that it's all arranged. I have a mate who knows a thing or two on his Rovers (a regular at Rovertech as well) and he can do it for me when it does go, so that's sorted. I was braced for the worst when I saw the mayo on viewing it, it was probably me pointing this out that made the bloke lenient on the price.

Other than what I have mentioned, and the little odd jobs that have needed to be done, the car has been pretty faultless.
 

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Clean the arches out, waxoyle then pack them with grease. My rear passenger arch had gone abit wavy on the lip when i bought it two years ago , bit little has changed. The driver side one is still mint and has been treated the same way.
 

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Metros are prone to rear arch rusting but the critical thing seems to be how well looked after the car is. Last month I saw G reg Metro (A series model) in a scrapyard and the rear arches, including the return edges, were like new. I think it had been scrapped due to front end crash damage.
 

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Devonshire Dave said:
why do all the ones i have seen have rusty arches, and only the rear ones too? also how much would it be to get the arches replaced?
Rover Group began fitting plastic arch liners to the Metro after 1989, but only on the front. The rear arches do not have them and thats one of the main reasons why the rears are more likely to go...
 

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I wouldn't mind another Metro either, as a cheap base for a project, and a car that has tons of tuning potential etc. I too have seen loads of rusty ones about, and usually the sills and rear arches are the worst. Even late 96-97 cars can be really scruffy and show lots of rust in places. My 97R 114, i had when it was 12mths old was immaculate, and i still even today sometimes wish id kept this car and looked after it, as it could have still been mint today, but just alot faster around corners as well as in a straight line.

Iv'e always wanted to drive a Metro Gti to see how they handle, as i was never impressed with the 114's handling, it was no better than my Transit van really, or at least it rolled just as much around corners if not more!

Otherwise it was a very good car period!

Im just trying to decide now if i can manage without power steering, as i assume there is no way to convert the Metro to PAS, seeing as every car and van ive had since has had this feature, and im not sure id want to go back to a non PAS car now?

If not then i might try and hunt down a Maestro Turbo, 220Gti, or possibly something like a Mazda 323 GTX or CRX mk1?

I reckon the Metro would take some beating tho, in terms of being easy to work on and modify/tune. And also cheap and good availability of spares and tuning parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks for your advice guys! keep it coming please. i'm trying to convince the misses why i should have a 100 over a AX or anything else.

another thing, is why do they have such big sills. compared to most other cars, its like getting in a bath, climbing over the rail. does it make the body shell more rigid? it drove very well, and handled beautifully.

cheers, dave
 

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Stevo135+ said:
Iv'e always wanted to drive a Metro Gti to see how they handle, as i was never impressed with the 114's handling, it was no better than my Transit van really, or at least it rolled just as much around corners if not more!
Great!! I had a 1991 GTi MPFi Special Edition, with the rover sport alloys, half leather, red belts, etc.

Really agile and great fun. ZS180 like turn in. Had to be a bit careful though as they had some nasty lift off oversteer, which you had to be quick to catch as of the short wheelbase.
 

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Devonshire Dave said:
another thing, is why do they have such big sills. compared to most other cars, its like getting in a bath, climbing over the rail. does it make the body shell more rigid? it drove very well, and handled beautifully.

cheers, dave
That's a safety feature that was years ahead of its time when introduced - the high sill interlocks with the doors and provides side impact protection, although at a fairly low level.

I feel it's the luck of the draw with rusty rear wheel arches. Both my MG Metro and my GTi were faultless in this respect, although I'll admit to being fanatical about cleaning them properly as I knew of the problems in this area.
 

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IIRC the Rover 100 is reasonably rust resistant, a design flaw for the rear arches makes them prone to damage and rusting, but generally for it';s age of design, the later Rover 100's were fairly resistant. You do see a lot about that are generally looking quite good for their 10+ years

Get the best condition you can for the money - should be ok
 

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Ian Senior said:
That's a safety feature that was years ahead of its time when introduced - the high sill interlocks with the doors and provides side impact protection, although at a fairly low level.
Worked quite well too, even the dire euro-ncap said it's side protection was fairly good, which for the age of the design was very good. I remember watching a police car chase, filmed from a helicopter, and a Metro was hit side on, quite hard, I was amzaed how little deformation occured
 

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My son had a 114, his very first car.
I thought it was great to drive, better then the 25 (don't hit me).
I used to make up excuses to borrow it just for the pleasure of driving it around.
I'm still waiting for the reason MGR stopped production of their biggest seller before they had a replacement ready. Crazy!
 
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