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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this in auto, motor + sport - a review from 40 years ago - and thought I'd give it a go. If anyone wants to use the translation, can they please credit me?

Note that, in 1969, a saloon with 149bhp that does 0-60 in 13s is pretty dang sporty.

ROVERCRAFT

Effortless power in unassuming form:
The Rover 3500 V8 is a gentleman’s express

After starting with its larger, older limousine, Rover is now putting the alloy V8 it obtained from Buick into the smaller 2000 as well. In doubling the number of cylinders, it has created a model which is the embodiment of charming understatement. The Rover lettering on the elegantly-ribbed valve covers gives nothing away of the American past of the short-stroke 3.5-litre engine. Automatically-adjusted hydraulic tappets ensure smooth running, and, in combination with the standard three-speed automatic transmission, it seems that the ultimate and best solution has been found to the question of what engine to choose for this technically-advanced, but externally unassuming, Rover.

The driver hears little but sees a lot. The car proceeds quietly, but with great power. This despite the fact that, with its 1,365 kilograms all-up weight, the 3500 is no lightweight - otherwise its 149 DIN bhp would propel it to even better performance figures. But a 116mph top speed is respectable enough as it is, and the acceleration - 0-62 in 13.0 seconds - relieves the driver of any problems with hills or overtaking. The driver who wishes to take some advantage of this power will, however, be rewarded with fuel consumption of 18mpg or lower.

It must also be said that interior and boot space are very tight for a DM16,000 [without inflation: €8,000] car, which is why the spare wheel can also be mounted on top of the boot lid. The tasteful interior, with its four well-contoured, comfortable leather seats, makes up for this with softness like that of the suspension, which swallows all kinds of bumps brilliantly. Added to its good straight line ride and its above average cornering ability, this qualifies the 3500 especially as a touring car for fast, relaxed driving. And while there may be only a few dealers in Germany, this car doesn’t give the impression of needing to visit the garage frequently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
An interesting read, thanks Pat!
it is interesting - the car clearly has quite a few bad points - cramped boot, high consumption, not many dealers, quite high price - but it's a pretty positive report on a pretty exotic car, almost as though they want to overlook the bad bits!

Standards change, but the reports on all current cars concentrate on comprehensive safety equipment (at least partly out of fashion, and, also, it favours the German manufacturers) and there is an obsession with what the dashboard should look like (chunky soft-feel plastics) and where the switches must be (e.g. headlights must be a knob on the dash) which you could easily transport back forty years to roast a car which must have been competing against, but different from, the likes of the NSU Ro80(?), Audis and even Mercs.

Which makes the Jag XFR's recent victory against the M3 all the more implausible!
 

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classic_rover
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They were a great car, but MUCH faster with the 5 speed manual box.
Even so, 13 secs seems a bit on the slow side for the auto. Maybe the demo vehicle was still a bit 'tight'.

I always fancied one, but fuel consumption was a bit heavy for a daily driver...improved on the SD1.

I've had a couple of TVRs with the 3.9 and 4 litre injected versions of the RV8 (pulling rather less weight !), and they're a lovely old engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
that is brilliant i am very jelous of your language skills

:URGOD:
glad you like it.

I'm waiting to see if someone would like some translation for money ATM!

EDIT

As for the competition, I see the NSU Ro80 did 0-60 in 12.4s, had 128 DIN bhp, and also did 18mpg, so it was direct competition.

http://www.uniquecarsandparts.com.au/nsu_ro80_technical_specifications.htm

It also cost less: DM14,150 in 1967...

http://www.chroniknet.de/indx_de.0.html?article=247152&year=1967
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Just look at that price... you could have bought a cottage in Cornwall in 1969 for that money... and get change!
well I make it 4 marks to the dollar and 3 dollars to the pound, so about 12 marks to the pound...what a good time that would have been to open an account in Germany (if you could!)

So DM16,000 is about £1,400 max in 1967...

but you could still buy a house in Blackpool for that worth £300k today!

It is about time the house prices DROPPED it just was so ridiculous,
property was out of reach for the normal hard working people of England, my house had risen from £1.500 (1967) TO A STAGGERING £300.000(2005) ...
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...aled-Towns-house-prices-fallen-20-months.html

(note a Daily Mail reader accusing the Labour Government of thoughtlessly pushing house prices up!)

I know you needed around £5,000+ for a decent house in the East Midlands in the late sixties - but even then, only 3-4 luxury cars! The Jags in the local showroom are £35k (down from 42) but you won't get a house for much less than ten times that round here...
 

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classic_rover
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Compared with today, cars were much more expensive in the sixties, though they hardly rose in price between the fifties and say, 1969.

In 1967 my parents paid £3000 for a typical suburban semi...facing on to York racecourse. Now worth maybe £250,000 as it's a pretty sought after spot.

My first company car in 1971 (Hillman Avenger 1250 DL...reg.JDT 640K) retailed at £857 inc. taxes, (you remember every detail about your first car ..lol!) and a 1967 family car would have been about the same.

Going upmarket a bit, the first 1970 MK3 Cortina could be had for around £900.

As a trainee rep' with a blue chip company I earned a basic of £750 a year at that time ('71).

I could get 4 gallons of petrol for £1.30 at the cheapo garage, and a packet of **** for 20p....etc,etc,etc. :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It's interesting how the "how many cars are worth a house?" debate shows that there always has been a North-South divide.

I believe you can't buy a two-up, two-down in the less fashionable areas round here for less than £200k.

I also seem to recall HTR looking at decent semis (here: £300k-£600k) in the Boston area for only £120k or so (no more than four Jags).

£3,000 would not have bought a bungalow in Leicestershire in 1960.

I know a Hillman Imp like this model year (evidently 72/73) (must be rare, first one was on Google p3) cost just under £1000 then...that's inflation!



When you consider how much better cars have got nowadays, a Peugeot 107 for under 9,000 of today's pounds is an absolute bargain in comparison! I expect the ordinary worker doesn't have to put in anything like as many hours to buy one as he did an Imp...

Measuringworth.com says earnings of £1,000 in 1971 equate to £18,800 today...so the better car is half the price, using earnings...

(the Dandy was 2d (1½p) before decimalisation, now it's £2!)

(incidentally, I see a 1-litre 107 does 0-60 in 14.2s so only just behind the Rover sports limousine, though its fuel economy is claimed to be three times better) :yikes:
 
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