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rover_25
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just spoke to a mechanic because i want a coolant flush and engine flush. I bought a rover 25 last week, that had the HG replaced in October. The coolant tank is all black on the inside so i imagine it was never flushed when the HG failed. I thought i would get the oil and filter done and coolant flushed and re bled. The mechanic told me he would do the oil and filter for £40 but wouldn't touch the coolant as "the are a ***** to bleed"

How true is this?

Regards

John
 

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rover_25
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it isn't that hard tbh it is easy all you have to do if take the bottom pipe off the raditor and flush it out with some water and then reconnect the pipe and fill it up with anti freeze and water and them start the car and undo the bleed bolt to let the air out job done
 

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mg_zr
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Quoted from a member on here called ashy:

I've done it a good few times now and never had a problem with airlocks. Slow and continuous filling is the key. No good just filling a jug up, pouring that in and then filling it up again as that's how air gets trapped.

My method is to use a syphon. I use a fishtank syphon, about £3-£4, as I don't want to get any in my mouth, but any old bit of hose pipe will do, just don't suck it into your mouth.

Fill a bucket or bowl with the right amount of coolant/water mix and then put one end of the tube in the coolant tank and one end in the bucket. Undo bleed screw and then just wait until a good flow of liquid comes through.
Run the engine for a bit without the expansion tank cap on and then switch off and allow to cool.
Bleed again and then take the car for a run and then a final bleed when cool.
I don't usually get any air on the second bleed with this technique.
 

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Hey fella, I have to say what the 'muchanic' said is a load of old toffee, I found them no harder to bleed than just about anything else I've worked on. I recently changed the radiator on my own car and it's straight forward to bleed the system, you just need to be thorough.


If the cooling system is still harbouring leftover crud from the past HGF, use some radiator flush (Holts do a good one). With the engine cold or as near cold as possible, set the cabin temp to control to max heat, drain the system by removing the filler cap on the coolant tank and remove the lower radiator hose (not by grass though as antifreeze will kill it effectively!) and using mains water pressure from a hose try to flush away as much of the old coolant as possible.

With the first flush done, connect up the lower rad hose and add the radiator flush, then slowly begin to fill the cooling system via the tank, cold water is fine but hot water will help a small amount with the warm up process when you come to start the car to bleed the system. once the car has taken enough water as it appears it's going to, start the engine and don't panic when the coolant level suddenly begins to drop! Just add more water as the level drops.

you will now need to open the bleed screw which has an 8mm bolt head and is situated on the section of thick metal pipe which passes overhead the gearbox, if nothing at all comes out you may need to poke a little sediment through with a small sharp tipped screwdriver (which I had to do when I did a HGF repair 3 years ago) to allow trapped air out and water to flow. As soon as you have a steady stream of water with no air reinsert the 8mm bolt, NB, the former doesn't take long to happen either! a few seconds usually.

Bleed the system with the cap removed, but don't forget to replace it before taking the car out for a drive!


You can begin to squeeze the main upper and lower pipes rapidly to move any trapped air and then removing the 8mm bolt to expel air, as you repeat this process(you will need to repeat this process quite a few times), keep an eye on the water level and top up as necessary. NB, at this time of year if the temps are low enough to induce freezing, the radiator flush won't prevent the cooling system from freezing up, so don't allow the car to sit over night! when you're happy that the coolant level seems stable, take the car out for a good run whilst keeping an eye on the temp gauge like a hawk, and also take a large container of warm water with you just in case. Stop now and then to check sufficient coolant exists in the coolant tank.

Give the car a good run at full operating temp, then once back home let the engine cool so it's still at least warm (to prevent freezing up) but not hot, then drop the flushing water, referring to the initial draining process.

Add a 50/50 antifreeze and water mix to the coolant tank ( I think the system total capacity is around 5 litres, so 3 litres of antifreeze is ample to do the job with). You can either premix the antifreeze and water or add the complete dose of antifreeze to the coolant tank and then top up with water, either works well, though I usually just add the antifreeze and top up with water.

Repeat the section where I pertain to bleeding the system.

Keep an eye on the cooling system for a few days after, you may find one or two top ups will be necessary at a cold inspection, but that's perfectly fine and normal.

As for the type of antifreeze(coolant) to use, many will say OAT is far better at what it does that normal ethylene glycol, but I can't support such a bold statement personally. The clear benefit of OAT is that it has a longer service life, around 5 years compared to around 2 to 3 years for ethylene glycol. the latter is a lot cheaper too and I've never had a problem with it. It depends what year of car you have, I don't recall, but after a certain year all Rover models came with OAT from the factory, the yellow and black collar under the coolant tank filler cap will advise if the car uses OAT or not. Generally though, OAT is pink or orange in colour, while ethylene glycol is usually blue green or sometimes yellow, and while not castastrophic, it's not advisable to mix eth glyc with OAT, there's no goodly reason why you would ever really need to either.

When you say the coolant tank is black inside, literally black or just murky looking? You can clean the tank out by using some dishwasher/washing soap powder, very hot water and a stiff brush with a cranked handle. Some prefer to wash it in a dishwasher, but I'm not much for that method!
 

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rover_200_95_99
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Thanks,Good info for my first rover flush

Thanks for the good info, ive just bought a rover 200 1.4si with 71000 miles on the clock and one lady owner for £395 and the temp runs just fine but ill have to change the rad as the bottom part has rusted and the fan has come free from the bottom. Got a new rad for £25 some 50/50 mix and new hose clips. Its a nice drive and cant wait to mess around with the engine as i have already done the oil,air and sparks.....But your thread sound like one of the better ones i have come across with some top info...THANKS FOR THE TIPS
 

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rover_25
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Hey, I have replaced the thermostat and flushed the system and have been bleeding the system for air. When I take the car for a small run i come back and the expansion tank is full, I open the air lock screw and water comes out. I turn the engine off and it drops. Am i missing some air locks or is there something else wrong?
 
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