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rover_800
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Mini Convertible fails driving test
THE DRIVING Standards Agency has banned learner drivers from taking driving tests in the new Mini Convertible.

"It has very restricted rearward vision and would be unsuitable for tuition and test," the Agency confirmed to AutoWired, yesterday.

"The vast majority of hatchbacks, saloons and estate cars are suitable, but there are a number of vehicles, mainly cabriolets and convertibles, that have large blind spots and present both instructors and pupils with problems of observation," said the Agency.

It added that as a responsible employer it has a 'Duty of Care' to ensure the safety of its staff and candidates.
 

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i cant see why any driving instructor would want one? surely the insurance on them woudl be huge? and i personally dont think people should be learning to drive ( or at least most learner drivers) in a 1.6 engined car!
 

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i learnt in a 1.8 ford focus and i thought it was quite acceptable, a car is only as fast as the person driving it, and with it being a bigger car is safer in crashes, and easier for other motorists to see. the manouvers were harder because of a longer wheelbase than other learner cars but it preoares somen better for when they get their first car, a good learner car is not neccesarily the easist to drive.

chris
 

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talking of cars people learn to drive in. AA uses the Focus, Ive seen a Ford Puma and MG ZR's in use as well.
Can even recall seeing a previous gen large hatch toyota Corolla being used.
 

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Could just as easily be...

Mini Convertible fails driving test

THE DRIVING Standards Agency has banned learner drivers from taking driving tests in the new Mini Convertible.

"For reasons we can't establish, pupils suddenly seem oblivious to everything else on the road as soon as they get into the driver's seat," the Agency confirmed to AutoWired, yesterday.

"The vast majority of hatchbacks, saloons and estate cars are suitable, but there are a number of vehicles, mainly BMWs and convertibles, that seem to induce both instructors and pupils with problems of observation," said the Agency.

It added that as a responsible employer it has a 'Duty of Care' to ensure the safety of its staff and candidates, as well as other road users.

:bgrin2:
 

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cmburgin said:
the manouvers were harder because of a longer wheelbase than other learner cars but it preoares somen better for when they get their first car, a good learner car is not neccesarily the easist to drive.

chris
I learnt in a Ford Focus and was glad to due to it being bigger and hence harder to manouvre in some cases so you learnt better. On the other hand it was very forgiving but that is both good and bad. I believe all learner drivers should have to drive - not necessarily be tested in one though - a harder to drive car. One without PAS, no ABS for emergency stopping, softer brake pedal and a less forgiving and predictable clutch.
I only say this as getting my R100 which exhibits all of these features wasn't so much a shock (after all my dad had an SD1 which I had a few goes in - talk about different day different clutch), but more a reality check. Kinda glad at the same time though as I feel owning such a car has definitely improved driving skills.

I think someone who goes from driving an easy car when learning to an easy car when driving will take longer to improve upon their mistakes, especially when super-light steering for example will help them get out of tight spots they shouldn't have put their car into in the first place.
 

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I had many lessons in a gutless Nova with no Power Steering and no ABS, it was a complete nightmare.

Personally I think everyone should learn in a medium sized car (Focus/Astra), a mate of mine learned to drive in a Clio and bought a R400 Saloon when he passed, he felt like he was driving a bus and after 5 years he still cant reverse park it because of the boot......idiot :rotflmao:
 

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i dont think it really has anything to do with how easy a car is to drive. if i had of learnt in a 1.6 for isntance, then got my first car and it was a 1,1 id be wanting to go faster all the time. id say the vast majority of us on this board are sensible people, but what about young charvas that learn to drive in large engined cars that then go out and get bigger cars as there first car cos they think they can handle what they have learnt to drive in, when actually they cant. cos you have passed your test it dosnt mean your a great driver, like someone else said earlier you only really learn to drive after you have passed your test.
 

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There were a few suggestions several years ago that they were going to introduce a motorbike style engine size limit for new drivers. There was obviously a lot of argument against it, as the idea died a death.

My instructor changed his car a couple of weeks before my first test, which was great, especially when you have to re-learn all your manouevres. Mind you, after passing in a 1.2 Corsa with no PAS and manual everything, it was very nice being able to drive my dad's brand new 414 with all mod cons.
 

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deelunn said:
i cant see why any driving instructor would want one? surely the insurance on them woudl be huge? and i personally dont think people should be learning to drive ( or at least most learner drivers) in a 1.6 engined car!
Its the tiny cars that are dangerous because they are a nightmare entering dual carriageways/motorways and they dont prepare drivers to be able to handle a normal sized car. Thats why im glad i learnt in an AA Focus (hardly a ferrari).

btw most of these idiot boy racers dont even have a license
 

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alot of people to get a 'normal' sized car as there first car tho - lots of people can only afford 1litre engines cars that have no power steering etc and when you have learnt in a car that has all that you have to relearn in a car that dosnt - its a whole different ball game. either way minis souldnt be a car people learnt to drive in! imo or any other convertable! theres no need!
 

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deelunn said:
alot of people to get a 'normal' sized car as there first car tho - lots of people can only afford 1litre engines cars that have no power steering etc and when you have learnt in a car that has all that you have to relearn in a car that dosnt - its a whole different ball game. either way minis souldnt be a car people learnt to drive in! imo or any other convertable! theres no need!
IWhen you learn in a cheap little car with no power, unassisted brakes and steering, getting into a bigger car with all the kit is much easier to drive.

My first experience of a large car was going from driving a Nova in the UK as a teenager to renting a huge Dodge something or other in the states. It was so much easier.

Small cars are unpleasant and tiring to drive.
 

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they may be small and unpleasant but thats my point! it gives you extra skills in driving. liek you say when you went to a bigger car it was easier, therefore probably safer had it been the other way round, and you went from fully equipt to banger then you wouldnt of been as comfortable driving it and therefore in my opinion not as safe!
 

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There was a LARGE advert in Autoexpress this week with some Show-off Instructor in a Mini Convertable.... I think it was Autoexpress......

Prat...

Also, to make this note sweeter, I've seen 2 broken down in 2 days..... haha
 

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I learned in a hyuandi accent. Weird cars so they are - glad i've passed and got my 25 now! So much easier and a nicer driver - and with 105 - got a bit of power if needed
 
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