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'06 MG ZR +120 (HQM) '04 MG ZR 105 (IAB)
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Probably worth flagging up one of the biggest changes - the categorisation of degrees of failure - Minor. Major and Dangerous.

Under the existing rules, you can still drive the vehicle back home even if it has failed an MOT test provided the previous MOT certificate hasn't expired. Under the new rules, if anything is classified as 'Dangerous', it over-rides the existing MOT certificate and will mean that you cannot drive the vehicle home after the test.
 

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Interesting, this grabbed my attention: 'When the rules change on 20 May 2018, vehicles won’t need an MOT from the 40th anniversary of when they were registered. You can check the date the vehicle was registered online.'

My classic motorbike is due for a MOT mid-Apr. I prob won't bother now and wait until 20 May and get it anyway. :grin:

Thanks for posting Ed3.
 

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cityrover
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Yes... I put this link there as I reckon it is in some ways a very big change.

Regards 40+ year classic bikes/cars best check with insurer as the bikers gossip speculated in recent years that insurers may seek higher premiums for classic bikes of 40+ years old that have not been put through an MOT test.

I wonder what interpretations may be used to say something is dangerous to prevent driving your car home. As we are aware in theory any car could be temporarily banned from the road for a couple of days or so as dangerous if there is an MOT test last thing in the afternoon or may be last thing Friday afternoon and a wiper or light/headlight breaks during the test and the garage does not have the time or parts to hand to fix it.
 

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mg_zr
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who makes these things up :surprise::surprise:eek:ne day we wont have cars everyone be walking because of these rules i no been safe on the road and to others is a key fact but WOW thanks for finding this or id havnt had a clue
 

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Yes... I put this link there as I reckon it is in some ways a very big change.

Regards 40+ year classic bikes/cars best check with insurer as the bikers gossip speculated in recent years that insurers may seek higher premiums for classic bikes of 40+ years old that have not been put through an MOT test.

I wonder what interpretations may be used to say something is dangerous to prevent driving your car home. As we are aware in theory any car could be temporarily banned from the road for a couple of days or so as dangerous if there is an MOT test last thing in the afternoon or may be last thing Friday afternoon and a wiper or light/headlight breaks during the test and the garage does not have the time or parts to hand to fix it.
Insurers: oh yeah, I can imagine this - you insurance Ts&Cs could still stipulate an MOT even if the gov doesn't need it :frown:

Dangerous: I should think some less scrupulous garages will be rubbing their hands together, getting a monopoly on repairs on cars they can fail on 'dangerous' faults that can't be moved. >:)
 

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Having now looked through the draft version of the new MOT inspection manual (available here: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/696292/mot-inspection-manual-for-classes-3-4-5-and-7-from-20-may-2018-draft.pdf), I don't think it will actually make a huge difference to what the MOT station can insist on repairing (and of course, not all MOT stations do repairs anyway).

The fail points that are classified as 'Dangerous' are indeed mainly ones which put the vehicle in a dangerous state, and would probably mean the testing station would not allow it to be driven away under the current rules.

The difference will be that whereas previously you could still insist on driving the vehicle home, or to a place of repair after an MOT failure of any kind using the unexpired previous certificate, from May 18th, driving the vehicle on the road after a 'Dangerous' classification on the test could result in a large fine and 3 penalty points on the drivers licence.
 

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The mot test station cannot stop you driving it home - And it always was an offence to drive a car on the road in a dangerous condition - but they seem to be making it much easier to prove this as I think a dangerous fail will show up on the system - i.e. you've been told not to drive it so you can't claim your old MOT is still valid so it must be ok to drive...
 

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'06 MG ZR +120 (HQM) '04 MG ZR 105 (IAB)
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I think it is more that such faults will now be specifically recorded on the MOT certificate, and will make it implicitly clear that the vehicle is considered dangerous to drive, whereas the definition of a failure had not previously given such a clear classification (it was left to the MOT tester to advise the owner that vehicle was unsafe to drive, which left a bit of a grey area if the vehicle was subsequently stopped by the police or DVSA). With such an explicit notification on the certificate, any driver caught on the road with a vehicle which has a 'Dangerous' classification on the MOT fail document is likely to feel the full force of the law - up to a £2500 fine and 3 penalty points on their driving licence.
 

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Anyone maintaing their own vehicle shouldn't have problems.
It's the "lift the bonnet once a year" people that will suffer.

The amount of times people have said "is it broken again"
No i'm doing a service and checking ball joints/bearings fluids etc.
 

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I can see one possible problem with the new rules.

A couple of years ago, my motorbike failed its MOT on the rear suspension. The certificate was annotated that the Tester considered the bike dangerous to ride. I rode it home. There, I replaced the suspension unit and took it back for a retest, where it passed.

My point is: If the bike failed now. It's highly likely I wouldn't be allowed to ride it home (if the new rules are interpreted they way that people are saying).

I'm confident that you're not going to be 'nicked' going to and from a Test Centre (as long as the Test was pre-booked). The same would apply to a Garage for a repair.
 

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other_manufacturer
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What would happen if you took your car to a council mot station (that has no facility for repair work) and it failed with a ‘dangerous ‘ fail. Can’t be driven but can’t be repaired where it is?
 

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What would happen if you took your car to a council mot station (that has no facility for repair work) and it failed with a ‘dangerous ‘ fail. Can’t be driven but can’t be repaired where it is?
low loader or suspended tow to a place of repair (depending on the fail)
 

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low loader or suspended tow to a place of repair (depending on the fail)
Meanwhile, you have to walk home. Just who pays for the tow?

Seriously folks. I'm of the firm belief that driving the car home and then onto a Garage for a pre-booked repair isn't going to get you into trouble with the fuzz. It's the driving around before the (pre-existing) MOT expires that the Government had in mind when they changed the rules.
 

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It has always been the case that if you are caught driving a vehicle on the highway which is in a dangerous or unroadworthy condition, you are committing an offence for which you may be prosecuted. This is regardless of whether the vehicle has a current valid MOT certificate or not.

Up to now, the status of a vehicle which has just failed an MOT test has been ambiguous - it has been assumed that you could drive an MOT failure away for repair, but if the failure was dangerous (or caused a crash on the way), you could still have been stopped and prosecuted. It was a grey area, but I have heard of cases where an MOT tester has warned an owner that their vehicle is not to be driven until it has been repaired.

The new classification of dangerous, actually makes it clear that the vehicle is dangerous to take on the road, and as such gives no leeway if you do get stopped. If that means you have to organise a tow or transport to a place of repair, that will be at your own cost - it is nobody elses fault but yours if you present a vehicle for an MOT test which is in a dangerous state of repair. The MOT test is for the DfT to ensure that vehicles in use on the road are in a suitable state of repair to be allowed on the highway - it is not a procedure for owners to find out what faults their vehicle has (but it is apparent from the number of failures for easily rectifiable things like blown light bulbs, insecure batteries and worn tyres, that many owners do no maintenance whatsoever until forced to by an MOT fail). It is up to the vehicle owner to check their vehicle (or have a competent mechanic check it for them) prior to the test, and rectify any faults that are found before presenting it for testing.

Most of these changes are being brought in to comply with European directive 2014/45/EU Periodic Technical Inspection, which is part of the EU Roadworthiness Package, and as such, similar changes (including the classification of faults as Dangerous, Major or Minor are being made to the roadworthiness tests in all EU countries. The amount that the UK is having to change and tighten up on within the UK MOT test is an indication of how far the UK MOT test lags behind some other EU nations where the tests are considerably more stringent than ours have been (Germany and the Netherlands in particular).
 

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rover_45
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The UK did not however take up the option of 2 yearly testing which I believe other countries allow, so we were all ready testing more frequently than some other countries and that will continue.
 

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rover_600
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A lot of these decisions (Dangerous or otherwise) will come down the individual MoT tester.

If some of you look back through the R600 postings from the state of the sills of my R600 last Oct when I put it in for an MoT there were a lot of varying levels of comment about missing sills, but the tester didn't bat an eyelid.....'just needs that all welding up mate, but there's quite a bit there'

Whereas I do remember in the olden days getting a couple of MoT failures back with the section 'In my opinion this vehicle is dangerous to drive because :" section filled in. I did fix the issues, but I still drove them home.

Now, do we think that some of franchises will be getting their testers to be a bit more stringent on some of these issues, like make more Majors -> Dangerous... ??? Hmmm I think they will....

[email protected]
 

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mgf
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apart from the Dangerous side read the rest many have made changes to there cars and from may will be a fail .
also no more early mot testing and much more at the end of the day this is not an mot its just to remove older and diesel cars off the road
 

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.....also no more early mot testing .....
Would you please clarify what you mean here, as I can find no reference to any change to being able to preserve the expiry date of the old certificate by taking a vehicle for a test up to one month in advance.

It has nothing to do with removing old vehicles or diesel vehicles from the road - it is wholly to do with removing badly maintained and unroadworthy vehicles from the road (and many of these are not old at all). It is also aimed to remove vehicles which have been modified by their owner to no longer comply with the vehicle and emissions regulations that they were originally type-approved under. Anyone who presents a properly maintained vehicle, which has NOT had safety or pollution relevant parts removed or unsuitably modified will have no real difficulty in recieving a new MOT certificate, regardless of vehicle age or fuel type.

Having done further research, it is also apparent that currently there is an official exemption for driving a vehicle with no current MOT (or having just failed an MOT) to a different place away from the testing station for repairs to be carried out. It is reasonable to assume that this will continue (as no mention has been made of rescinding it).
 
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