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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My my tf passed it m.o.t.wensday at the second attempt. Failed on holes in the outer sill .when I dropped the car at the m.o.t Station there were no holes and no sight of any holes how ever when l collected the cat there they were do the testers hit the sill with hammers as both holes had the edges pushed in .welding cost 拢80.00.not done by test center the bloke who welded the plates on ground them back used body filler to blend them in and apply stone chip paint .Well happy with his workmanship.bit peeed of with the m.o.t center seems they were a bit zealous to me ho well all well in the end.馃檪馃檪
 

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My my tf passed it m.o.t.wensday at the second attempt. Failed on holes in the outer sill .when I dropped the car at the m.o.t Station there were no holes and no sight of any holes how ever when l collected the cat there they were do the testers hit the sill with hammers as both holes had the edges pushed in .welding cost 拢80.00.not done by test center the bloke who welded the plates on ground them back used body filler to blend them in and apply stone chip paint .Well happy with his workmanship.bit peeed of with the m.o.t center seems they were a bit zealous to me ho well all well in the end.馃檪馃檪
Yep they poke and prod with pointed bars, crowbars in suspension bushes and tap suspect areas with a hammer. All done to keep us and other road users safe. Regards D4KGP.
 

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..... Failed on holes in the outer sill .when I dropped the car at the m.o.t Station there were no holes and no sight of any holes how ever when l collected the cat there they were do the testers hit the sill with hammers as both holes had the edges pushed in
The MOT testing guidance for corrosion allows the tester to use finger and thumb pressure only for assessing the extent of the corrosion, and may only scrape or lightly tap the area with the special 'corrosion assessment tool' to verify that it falls within the criteria for a rejection. They are specifically forbidden to use force on the body shell or load bearing framework by hitting with a hammer or crow bar.

Appendix A section 3 of the MOT Testing Guide states:

Identify the important load bearing members and 鈥榩rescribed areas鈥 on a vehicle, then check if they are excessively corroded by:
  1. Visual inspection
  2. Use finger and thumb pressure to assess the extent of the corrosion
  3. If necessary, carefully scrape or lightly tap the affected areas with the corrosion assessment tool
Use of the corrosion assessment tool must be restricted to ascertaining that the failure criteria are met and not used for heavy scraping or poking of the affected areas.

The end sections of the sills are within 30cm of suspension mountings, and are therefore counted as load bearing and what is described as a 'prescribed area' which warrants special attention during the test. Rot in these areas is common on many cars, and even finger/thumb pressure can often create a hole through the rot.

Whilst it may seem harsh, probably better to have the issue brought to the fore now, and have the rotten area cut out and new metal welded in, rather than have it scrape through the test this year (with an advisory for 'prescribed area corroded but not seriously weakened') and then have the failure next year with a much larger area of repair and rectification needed ;)

Glad you got it through and it lives for another year, but all our MG Rover cars are now well into the kind of age where corrosion is increasing becoming a serious issue - it pays to do your own thorough poking and prodding around suspect areas well before the MOT test falls due and get them repaired: a) before the rot becomes worse, or even terminal, and b) to avoid having an unexpected MOT fail and a larger bill for an emergency (and possibly lower standard) repair at short notice than would probably be the case for a pre-booked appointment for repair at a bodyshop.
 

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The MOT testing guidance for corrosion allows the tester to use finger and thumb pressure only for assessing the extent of the corrosion, and may only scrape or lightly tap the area with the special 'corrosion assessment tool' to verify that it falls within the criteria for a rejection. They are specifically forbidden to use force on the body shell or load bearing framework by hitting with a hammer or crow bar.

Appendix A section 3 of the MOT Testing Guide states:

Identify the important load bearing members and 鈥榩rescribed areas鈥 on a vehicle, then check if they are excessively corroded by:
  1. Visual inspection
  2. Use finger and thumb pressure to assess the extent of the corrosion
  3. If necessary, carefully scrape or lightly tap the affected areas with the corrosion assessment tool
Use of the corrosion assessment tool must be restricted to ascertaining that the failure criteria are met and not used for heavy scraping or poking of the affected areas.

The end sections of the sills are within 30cm of suspension mountings, and are therefore counted as load bearing and what is described as a 'prescribed area' which warrants special attention during the test. Rot in these areas is common on many cars, and even finger/thumb pressure can often create a hole through the rot.

Whilst it may seem harsh, probably better to have the issue brought to the fore now, and have the rotten area cut out and new metal welded in, rather than have it scrape through the test this year (with an advisory for 'prescribed area corroded but not seriously weakened') and then have the failure next year with a much larger area of repair and rectification needed ;)

Glad you got it through and it lives for another year, but all our MG Rover cars are now well into the kind of age where corrosion is increasing becoming a serious issue - it pays to do your own thorough poking and prodding around suspect areas well before the MOT test falls due and get them repaired: a) before the rot becomes worse, or even terminal, and b) to avoid having an unexpected MOT fail and a larger bill for an emergency (and possibly lower standard) repair at short notice than would probably be the case for a pre-booked appointment for repair at a bodyshop.
Maybe some testers are not aware of Appendix A section 3 and therefore use hammer like tools, along with crow bars in suspension and pointed metal to poke and prod areas vulnerable to rust. If I were a tester I would not push my fingers into an area that might be rusted, get it caught and cut about exposing myself to a Tetanus infection. Regards D4KGP.
 

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Maybe some testers are not aware of Appendix A section 3
No such thing. All MOT testers are trained to DVSA standard, and have to do regular training updates. They are all well aware of what is required and what they are not permitted to do. If you know of any tester who is not adhering to the correct examination procedures, then report it to DVSA (they will investigate and either send the culprit for retraining or remove their MOT testing certification).

As for the ridiculous comment regarding tetanus - anybody who is working in situations where they are likely to be exposed to such a risk will already be fully inoculated against it. In my experience, the health and safety policy of most employers of outdoor or at risk workers requires it as a condition of employment. Besides which, we are are not talking of testers forcibly jabbing their fingers through the metal, but using pressure to sense the strength or otherwise of affected areas. They will mostly be wearing protective gloves for such tasks anyway.
 

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No such thing. All MOT testers are trained to DVSA standard, and have to do regular training updates. They are all well aware of what is required and what they are not permitted to do. If you know of any tester who is not adhering to the correct examination procedures, then report it to DVSA (they will investigate and either send the culprit for retraining or remove their MOT testing certification).

As for the ridiculous comment regarding tetanus - anybody who is working in situations where they are likely to be exposed to such a risk will already be fully inoculated against it. In my experience, the health and safety policy of most employers of outdoor or at risk workers requires it as a condition of employment. Besides which, we are are not talking of testers forcibly jabbing their fingers through the metal, but using pressure to sense the strength or otherwise of affected areas. They will mostly be wearing protective gloves for such tasks anyway.
We should agree to disagree on this matter. Regards D4KGP.
 

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I stuck corrosion assessment tool into ebay and hey presto it came up, VOSA approved but it looks like it could cause damage in the wrong hands. We should not really complain it's not real damage it has to come out anyway as you can't weld to rust although quite a few try.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have just seen the tool deepfat refered to and yes it definitely has the ability to do some damage
I did not I tend to start a heated debate just venting my spleen . I would rather pay to have the sill welded up than see the car scrapped .Really I know it's for safety reasons and the M.O.T is the basics required to keep us safe on the roads and to protect other road users.
So in the end alls well that ends well 馃檪馃檪馃檭
 
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