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Afternoon all,

Just a quickie. How long does your diesel take to get up to temperature? Given that it wasn't that cold this morning, the car is taking a good 7 miles before water temperature is normal. Admittingly, I keep the revs pretty much below 2500 and most of the journey to this point is around 1600-2000rpm.

Is this normal? Just seems quite a long time and thinking it could take ages to get up to temperature in the depths of winter.

Cheers,
Neil
 

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Arrgh! Neil, please do not take this the wrong way, but anyone who uses the temperature guage as an indication of whether their engine has warmed up or not is being misled. Infact, most modern cars don't even have water temperature guages anymore.

Why? The heat of the water is an unknown factor controlled by a thermostat. All it tells you is that the water has now reached 90-110 degrees. It is not an indication of whether your car is ready for a ragging or not. Oil temperature is though, and oil, depending on its viscocity can take a lot longer to become fully fluid than water takes to heat up. In fact, as oil, even in 0w form, is heavier than water it would take a lot longer for the oil to heat up than it would water.

In addition, my car might heat up quicker than yours as I have no Anti-freeze in it during summer. Anti-freeze in summer has the reverse effect and can over-heat an engine as its buklier by lowering the waters freezing point it also lowers the waters boiling point as the water is thinner.

I could carry on, but I hope you understand where I am coming from. There is no need to worry about how long your engine water takes to warm up. As long as it sits at half way and stays there, that is all you need to worry about.
 

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Afternoon all,

Just a quickie. How long does your diesel take to get up to temperature? Given that it wasn't that cold this morning, the car is taking a good 7 miles before water temperature is normal. Admittingly, I keep the revs pretty much below 2500 and most of the journey to this point is around 1600-2000rpm.

Is this normal? Just seems quite a long time and thinking it could take ages to get up to temperature in the depths of winter.

Cheers,
Neil
Your car is a victim of project Drive, the Fuel burning heater was removed from production cars at the end of 2001 in a cost cutting exercise.
The FBH heats up the engine quicker in about 3 to 4 miles from cold if the ambient temp is below 6degC.
This feature is nice retrofit to have especially when you add in the Parking heater option too. All 75's and ZT's are plumbed ready to accept the FBH, so with little mods you can DIY it. Search FBH and you will learn all about it.
 

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In addition, my car might heat up quicker than yours as I have no Anti-freeze in it during summer. Anti-freeze in summer has the reverse effect and can over-heat an engine as its buklier by lowering the waters freezing point it also lowers the waters boiling point as the water is thinner.
I can't believe I just read that - antifreeze also acts as a rust inhbitor and summer coolant (as it boils at a lower temperature, it doesn't get as hot, and doesn't exceed that temperature either)!!!

I've never noticed any issues having it in all year-round.
 

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True, but most people do not conduct Antifreeze changes (especially with Vacuum filled systems) and leave winter solutions in. As this is a strong concentrate the water thins and boils very quickly causing overheating and HGF. I run mineral water in summer, always have and during the summer months my temp guage sits between half and 1/4, never fully at half like it does in winter.

Mineral water also stops the build up of rust and limescale.
 

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I had a new thermostat fitted a couple of weeks back as the guage was taking a while to get round to mid temperature (before hand it used to sweep round to the middle almost right away)

Anyway it was ok for a few days and is doing the same again taking its time to get to the middle.

Asked them to fit a temp sensor at the time for the sake of what it cost but they didnt.

Its in for its 1st MOT tomorrow so have asked them to do the temp sensor aswell.

However are some owners finding it takes a while for the guage to register mid temperature? (had the car 2 /12 years and its only in last few weeks its not registered mid temp instantly)
 

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I didn't think antifreeze lowers the boiling point of water I thought it actually lifted the boiling point, aloowing a higher temperature before the water boils over.

"Solutions may be produced for the purpose of raising the boiling point and lowering the freezing point, as in the use of ethylene glycol in automobile cooling systems. The ethylene glycol (antifreeze) protects against freezing by lowering the freezing point and permits a higher operating temperature by raising the boiling point."

Andy
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input, glad its not just me!

I would never use the temperature guage as guidance for when I can hammer it, my drive to work is generally following other stuff between 30 and 70 and I just like to keep the revs low.

the FBH, something else to learn about, this will be interesting! Certainly interested in the parking heater for the coldest depths of winter.
 

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Neil, Your simple question seems to have generated a lot of replies but no answers!

My CDTi takes about 5 urban miles for the temperature gauge to reach the Normal mark in cool weather. It's one of the few penalties of having a quite highly efficient common-rail diesel engine.

I am amazed to read of antifreeze not being used in summer months in one of our engines. It does a lot more than prevent freezing, it contains corrosion preventatives that are absolutely vital all year round. Without it, diesels in particular can suffer from cavitation erosion.

Also, I have never before heard that water containing antifreeze "boils very quickly causing overheating and HGF". How many MGR CDTs keep the antifreeze in during summer months, and how many of these have suffered head gasket failure? Any?
 

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Hi,

My car takes ages to warm up in the winter it can take 15-20 minutes to get up to temp.

Shame as the car is chucking fuel away until its warms up.
 

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Neil, when not using the remote parking heater mine hits midway after about 4-5 miles urban driving. But in winter, that remote heater's the best thing since MG itself - one press of a button and it warms itself whilst I sit in the lounge with a cuppa! Ten minutes later, get in the car and it's blowing nice warm air at me with temp guage reading about quarter on starting!

If you can retro fit these as suggested, and not too pricey, get one. Mine's an ex-MGRover '53' ZTT CDTI which came with loads of goodies.
 

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Neil, Your simple question seems to have generated a lot of replies but no answers!
Not so. My first response was about FBH, not any of the nonesense about specific gravity of different fluids.

Post #3
Your car is a victim of project Drive, the Fuel burning heater was removed from production cars at the end of 2001 in a cost cutting exercise.
The FBH heats up the engine quicker in about 3 to 4 miles from cold if the ambient temp is below 6degC.
This feature is nice retrofit to have especially when you add in the Parking heater option too. All 75's and ZT's are plumbed ready to accept the FBH, so with little mods you can DIY it. Search FBH and you will learn all about it.
 

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lovel, Your response was very much on topic of course, and I found it useful.

However Neil's specific question was "How long does your diesel take to get up to temperature?" and no-one had answered that.
 

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Not so. My first response was about FBH, not any of the nonesense about specific gravity of different fluids.

Post #3
Your car is a victim of project Drive, the Fuel burning heater was removed from production cars at the end of 2001 in a cost cutting exercise.
The FBH heats up the engine quicker in about 3 to 4 miles from cold if the ambient temp is below 6degC.
This feature is nice retrofit to have especially when you add in the Parking heater option too. All 75's and ZT's are plumbed ready to accept the FBH, so with little mods you can DIY it. Search FBH and you will learn all about it.

You'd need a FBH up there in the arctic!

Whereas I didn't in the sub arctic of Perthshire.

Ron
 

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lovel, Your response was very much on topic of course, and I found it useful.

However Neil's specific question was "How long does your diesel take to get up to temperature?" and no-one had answered that.
7 miles is not unusual if driven gently.

In frosty weather I recommend letting it warm up for 5mins - makes defrosting quicker as well.
(I think I've just accidentally started another hot topic..!)

Ron
 

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lovel, Your response was very much on topic of course, and I found it useful.

However Neil's specific question was "How long does your diesel take to get up to temperature?" and no-one had answered that.
As a new member AND new owner I'll answer it. I'll also qualify it in regard to some of the other posts.....

The guage sits at the halfway point. However, I have been amazed as to how it takes to get there - many miles.

Paul
 

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True, but most people do not conduct Antifreeze changes (especially with Vacuum filled systems) and leave winter solutions in. As this is a strong concentrate the water thins and boils very quickly causing overheating and HGF. I run mineral water in summer, always have and during the summer months my temp guage sits between half and 1/4, never fully at half like it does in winter.

Mineral water also stops the build up of rust and limescale.
Sorry disagree. Lime is a mineral disolved in water. Mineral water contains minerals. One of those is lime, that causes........ Limescale.

Also the cooling system is pressurised therefore increasing the boiling point of the coolant to about 140-150 deg c. If you are experiencing coolant temp this high, you have an engine problem anyway.

A lot of K series HGFs happen because coolant strength is incorrect, causing corrosion. Also it sounds like your car is overcooling in summer. That in itself uses more fuel.
 

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... I run mineral water in summer, always have and during the summer months my temp guage sits between half and 1/4, never fully at half like it does in winter.

Mineral water also stops the build up of rust and limescale.
Regrdless of the pro's & cons of using anti-freeze which have been covered adequately already, if I were going to run without it I would use demineralised / distilled water, as used in batteries, rather than mineral water in which the (varying) minerals may come out of solution if boiled and which may promote corrosion.

Regards,
Kearton
 
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