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I know this turns up regularly, but some of the older tyre recommendations such as Toyo Snowprox and Kumho Izen seem unavailable from the usual suspects.

So, for a 98' VVC running 15" alloys:
What sizes? Same as summer tyres, or 185/55/R15 all round, or 195/50/R15 all round?
What tyres? Yokohama v906, Fallen HS01, Viking WinTech (a Continental brand), Toyo 944, Kumho WP51? R something else.

Be great to have some thoughts now it's getting colder.
 

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Unless you live or go to an area that spends a lot of the winter covered in the white stuff I would be tempted to fit a set of Michelin CrossClimate tyres. Although I don’t any experience with them on the TF, the Skoda came with a set and so far they have been as impressive as most of the reviews. The tyres seem to cope with the typical cold and damp UK autumn and winter conditions and on a suddenly hot spring day there is no concern that the tyre will be damaged.
 

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I second Chris' statement re Michelin CrossClimate tyres. I used them on my ex-Citroen C4 (w/ traction control) I never had an issue, even in the white stuff we Austrians occasionally have. And I do, BTW, live uphill.
 

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I have always avoided these types of tyres for no other reason than the snow here can get heavy and I am not sure about how compromised these types of tyres are in temperatures below 5 C and in particular -10C or below; are the compromises in either/or/both rubber compound and tread pattern,,,,...? So twice a year I go through the pain of switching between summer and winter tyres. I have not seen tests undertaken regarding these tyres but would love to be convinced.
 

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I have always avoided these types of tyres for no other reason than the snow here can get heavy and I am not sure about how compromised these types of tyres are in temperatures below 5 C and in particular -10C or below; are the compromises in either/or/both rubber compound and tread pattern,,,,...? So twice a year I go through the pain of switching between summer and winter tyres. I have not seen tests undertaken regarding these tyres but would love to be convinced.
Julian, it very much depends on the type of winter you are facing. Here in the south of Austria we have hardly any snow, so a pure winter (snow tyre actually) is a waste, as the roads are usually dry or just wet. So the CrossClimate is my choice as it provides better road holding in these conditions.

If you have loads of snow you may opt for changing the tyres twice a year.
But still the CrossClimate showed to be really convincing on a closed snow surface too.
Just my 2 pence
 

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As you will know living in Austria, summer tyres are not as effective as winter tyres below circa 5C. As a Brit living in the UK for many years until moving to die Schweiz, most Brits believe that if they have any traction in the snow using summer tyres, is sufficient. My wife and I are about to leave for the UK for a break and we have winter tyres on - Hopefully, we will not come across the idiots we saw several years ago travelling at 80MPH on the motorway in the UK with a thick layer of snow on the road and heavily snowing (and having no regard to stopping distance following cars in front of them).
 

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As you will know living in Austria, summer tyres are not as effective as winter tyres below circa 5C. As a Brit living in the UK for many years until moving to die Schweiz, most Brits believe that if they have any traction in the snow using summer tyres, is sufficient. My wife and I are about to leave for the UK for a break and we have winter tyres on - Hopefully, we will not come across the idiots we saw several years ago travelling at 80MPH on the motorway in the UK with a thick layer of snow on the road and heavily snowing (and having no regard to stopping distance following cars in front of them).
Don't get me started Julian! We live on a very slight hill (Lincolnshire) but hardly any of the neighbours cars can get up it in any kind of snow, regardless of how deep it might be. That proved to me just how poor summer tyres are in winter. I simply stay in, or walk the mile to our nearest supermarket. Snow is dangerous, and no-one will convince me other wise, I live close to the A1 and the idiots I see, beggars belief buddy.
 

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This isn't a perfect apple to apple comparison but I'll mention it because I think it is relevant.

On my 1994 Land Rover Discovery, I am using 4 season tyres (they have the snowflake on the sidewall, similar concept to the Michelin CrossClimate tyres) and I have found them to be very effective winter tyres, the tread is flexible at -10, compared to the all season tyres that are on the Disco the other 3 seasons of the year.
 

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This isn't a perfect apple to apple comparison but I'll mention it because I think it is relevant.

On my 1994 Land Rover Discovery, I am using 4 season tyres (they have the snowflake on the sidewall, similar concept to the Michelin CrossClimate tyres) and I have found them to be very effective winter tyres, the tread is flexible at -10, compared to the all season tyres that are on the Disco the other 3 seasons of the year.
Also you have 4 wheel drive?
 

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Also you have 4 wheel drive?
Yes, very true, the Disco is 4 wheel drive. What I should have said above is that I used the all season one winter before buying the 4 season tires and I felt more confident and comfortable using the 4 season tires in the winter compared to the all season tire. I should also say that I have pretty much always used winter tires on a vehicles during the winter. What I did notice different between the all season and 4 season tires is how poor 3 season tires are on ice.
 

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I’m very much on neutral ground and uncharted waters with this, but there appears to be a considerable amount of historic debate about which tyres (summer -I guess) to fit to these cars to make them less ‘twitchy’, and indeed which to avoid - at your peril if you don’t!
It could be me, but would anyone like to estimate how many of these car are in regular everyday use ( without the option of an alternative vehicle ) in climates of snow and ice -?
Am I way out in thinking this percentage is going to be low?
So the questions now are:- Is there sufficient experience out there of actually using winter tyres on these (in caps) cars? Hopefully yes- to satisfy the OP’s request for advice. Also, if such tyres as cross- climate are fitted, are these likely to have any adverse affect on the car‘s handling during the bulk of its annual use in non snow and ice conditions?
Kind regards,
Austin.
 

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I do not take the MGF out in winter here so no experience of winter tyres on the MGF. I did take it out once as I was moving house (9kms) and it was snowing with snow lying on the ground; on summer tyres, totally useless (as one would expect). My wife has an Audi Quattro Avant (a heavy car) and with winter tyres it is very good in the winter. But make no mistake, it is still very easy to lose traction on a slight incline if ice is under all 4 wheels.
 

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For myself, I brought the TF for enjoyment, and mostly having the top down. Wet, snow, or any adverse conditions it stays warm and dry in the garage, why not. Plus what does it cost to have a spare set of wheels £600, I take it you don't actually change the tyres onto its normal frames, would you?
 

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I was always taught (and continue to employ the philosophy of):

You drive "as fast as you can see" and "you drive to your own ability and the prevailing conditions".

I use Chingalese Ditchfinders on my 1995 F - never let me down...
 

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Richard - 2 sets of tyres and 2 sets of alloys so I can change the wheels at any time.

Ian - Like so many things in life, humans have the knack of overestimating their abilities and eyesight plus underestimating braking distances. Drive on the M4 in pouring rain on an early Friday evening and it is all there to see. The chevrons on the M4 are a useful aid to measure distance behind the car in front but do drivers know how to apply them or what they are there for.....
 
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