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I would actually like to do skid training in the TF, but not many places let you use yur own car,
The MGOT North Weald Activity day does cover part of that, under the instruction of Andy Walsh an ARDS instructor. Amongst other things we have a high speed bend 90 Degree which basically encourages you to push into it and many people spin the first time, I know i did :shake:

Andy will then explain how to check the skid and you have as many goes as you like to perfect it.. One car at a time onto a wide open runway so there's nothing to hit if you do loose it...

Unfortunately our September one (http://www.mgs-on-track.com/events/46/north_weald_2008-09-05.htm ) is already full but if you are interested register on the MGOT site and put yourself on the reserve list as we do get some drop outs nearer the time for various reasons

Stu
MGOT
http://www.mgs-on-track.com/aboutus
 

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thats what you get with mid engine rear wheel drive. try controling the slide with opersit lock and feathering the accelerator pedel insted of freaking out as soon as the wheels break traction
Despite other opinions, I'm with you on this one (the driving bit, not the spelling!!). This has been discussed many times in many threads and the reason most 'novices' spin out is because they do 'freak out' and instinctively lift off the throttle pedal - fatal. With the back end already sliding the resulting deceleration shifts weight from back to front making the back even lighter and the spin more inevitable. The tricky bit with the F/TF is that with the rear end sliding then 'planting' the throttle also makes matters worse by overwhelming the rear tyres' grip even more with additional torque, again making the spin more inevitable. Best to, as you say, feather the throttle i.e. no acceleration or deceleration and try to 'balance' the car as you steer into the skid. This takes a lot of practice, skill and nerve to get right and even when mastered does not guarantee you won't run out of room and still smack the kerb!!
 

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After 17yrs with the F she caught me out in the rain or I'd like to think rain and diesel spill (don;t usually drive the F or TF in the rain).....on the School run turning right at slow speed apply accelerator back end goes, loses grip, goes light and then snaps back, manic piece of opposite lock, no brakes, gave it power initially which made it worse so came off the power (no ABS on my F) steer it round the back of a parked car, trying to dab the brakes, over a dropped curb and into the edge of a driveway with luckily a huge overgrown conifer tree to cushion us.. My daughter and I look at each other, she remarks how calm I appear as the rush of adrenaline hits....car has small dent 6cm diameter on os front wing no paint damage.....which I dropped off at the PDR place an hour later to fic. No other damage well a machine polish to the clear coat probably for minor scratches....one lucky escape....no injury, no damage to 3rd parties and minor correctable damage to the F. Phew.

I treat my F and TF as Summer toys, I love driving them forget that when things go wrong they can bite back big time.
 

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That was lucky, good reminder that even the most experienced driver can still be taken by surprise.
Yes, driver training from an old occupation kicked in for sure....I have become blaise with the F and TF as have other more powerful cars and think of them as just playful fun.....today changed that silly mindset which is a good thing. A low speed loss of control and a £100 PDR repair I am a lucky chap.
 

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Double post but I cant ignore this.

Utterly wrong. Do this in a midish/rear engined car in the wet and you will be in SUBSTANCIALLY more trouble than before. Opposite lock, lift off and wait for more traction.

Applying more throttle will result in traction being lost and send you spinning into the nearest hard thing due to the resulting pendulum effect of 'most' of the weight at the rear.

If you have a front engined rwd car then by all means give it some beans and have a great time drifting it around! (Dont do it on public roads please, have had to stop for a numpty who ran out of talent on a roundabout before, not cool).

Discused in a previous thread - Driving condition tips?
What year did traction control come in then please? Do the older MGs have it?
 

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Sorry, trying to keep up. What's an F and C please?
C is MG C (car produced between 1967-1969)
F is MG F (car produced between 1995-2001)
TF is MG TF (car produced between 2002-2011)
 

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What year did traction control come in then please? Do the older MGs have it?
In regard to MG Rover cars only Rover 75 and after that MG ZT had traction control introduced as option that can be bought with the car. Rover 75 started production in 2000. No other car of MG Rover portfolio had traction control implemented.
 

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After 17yrs with the F she caught me out in the rain or I'd like to think rain and diesel spill (don;t usually drive the F or TF in the rain).....on the School run turning right at slow speed apply accelerator back end goes, loses grip, goes light and then snaps back, manic piece of opposite lock, no brakes, gave it power initially which made it worse so came off the power (no ABS on my F) steer it round the back of a parked car, trying to dab the brakes, over a dropped curb and into the edge of a driveway with luckily a huge overgrown conifer tree to cushion us.. My daughter and I look at each other, she remarks how calm I appear as the rush of adrenaline hits....car has small dent 6cm diameter on os front wing no paint damage.....which I dropped off at the PDR place an hour later to fic. No other damage well a machine polish to the clear coat probably for minor scratches....one lucky escape....no injury, no damage to 3rd parties and minor correctable damage to the F. Phew.

I treat my F and TF as Summer toys, I love driving them forget that when things go wrong they can bite back big time.
Hi , Got my tf last dec drove it a bit in winter ( never had a Rwd car before ) I had done about 3000 miles in it when I spun it after reading these posts I see where I may have gone wrong . I will set the scene it had been dry for weeks when it rained I was driving back along a familiar dual carriageway I came out of a roundabout probably doing 25/30 ish when I started to change to the left hand land I felt the back end go light and start to come out drivers side I swung on opposite lock fat too sharply that then which flicked the back end the other way then put lick on the other way again I had made matters worse I was super lucky came to a stop in a bus stop hitting nothing but shaken a lot . I like to think I hit a oil diesel patch but think I change lanes too quickly after a lot of weight was already at the drivers side after coming off the roundabout .
Well it’s taught me a lesson . Was used to driving a rover 75 before and it never missed a beat
 

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Before and after the PDR.....great job they machine polished the wing too, to get rid of the scratches from the foilage/branches in the clearcoat been using them for 20yrs of mishaps and trolley dings.

Will be SORNing the F end of the month.😅
.

Wheel Tire Car Land vehicle Vehicle



No dent

Tire Wheel Automotive parking light Car Vehicle
 

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Guys do slightly bigger tyres help with the spin were are talking about? Say moving to a 15'' to a 16''? An what tyres do they suggest for our little cars now-days please?
 

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At the risk of rehashing what has already been said, I believe the theory is that RWD (and mid-engined design doesn't help due to the position of the centre of gravity of the car shifting rearwards) generally gives oversteer as opposed to Front Wheel Drive (and front-engine placement) which gives understeer. Understeer is supposedly the safest of the two characteristics as oversteer can cause the back to break away suddenly and overtake the front! Understeer just tends to make the car run wide on a corner, in a more predictable, progressive manner.

In FWD, booting it in a hard turn causes the rubber on the rear (driven) tyres to squirm somewhat whilst lateral g-force is being applied in the turn and they can unstick under these combinations of loads and the friction of the rears can decrease significantly once they start sliding over the road surface (instead of rolling).

All the advice given on getting the correct tyres and pressures and alignment is spot on.

I have heard one additional thing which I'll mention here - one is that the presence of a spare wheel in the front boot can make a positive difference to handling. I can't claim I've ever driven without a spare tyre in the front boot so wouldn't know, but the car was very probably designed with a spare tyre in mind and then MG-Rover penny-pinched by only offering it as an option on a new car - the standard get-you-home device being a can of foam tyre sealant!

Oh, also any sloppiness in the wheel bearings or suspension will worsen the problem. They should catch that sort of thing in the MOT but you never know.
 

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Talking about wheel size reminds me of another comment I read on this forum - that the front tyres on the TF are narrower than the rears by 20mm (on all wheel sizes) to induce a little more understeer at the front to try and counter the oversteer. I'm not qualified to comment on whether that is true or if it works, but it sounds plausible. Who knows, it may be they're that way just to equalise the weight distribution on the contact patches of the tyres.
 

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Talking about wheel size reminds me of another comment I read on this forum - that the front tyres on the TF are narrower than the rears by 20mm (on all wheel sizes) to induce a little more understeer at the front to try and counter the oversteer. I'm not qualified to comment on whether that is true or if it works, but it sounds plausible. Who knows, it may be they're that way just to equalise the weight distribution on the contact patches of the tyres.

Yes, I have 11 spoke 16"s (with the same tyre sizes as my TF) on my F.
 

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may I add that you may easily spin even with the best setup and tyres, if one of those lorries spilt diesel all over the place trough a badly fitted fuel cap. happens quie regularly in roundabouts and makes them into skating rinks when wet :mad:
 
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