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mgf
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5,489 Posts
Just spotted this.

I had to wind the adjusters before i could remove them, and then i had to realign my headlamps afterwards.

Blimey, this was a long time ago - you're testing my memory now. :)

The adjusters are a ball and socket type arrangement - i seem to recall that there are 3 of these, the two (plastic) adjusters and a third (metal) one hidden off to one side which is a simple pivot point (this is the tricky one). The adjusters have the the ball on the end of a 'pin', with the screw thread below, the 'pin' allows the ball to slide into the socket a little and there is an opening in the side of the socket further up alowing the ball to be released - i'm going to draw you a quick sketch as this is difficult to describe (and i'm not sure i have done a very good job - see below). Basically, loosen them, then you can slide the ball into the socket and out.

Do this for both adjusters.

The metal one is a real pain, there is no such quick release method as far as i can tell, but it is screwed into the housing - if you have a small enough spanner (access for a tool is near on impossible i found) you may be able to unscrew it - other than this your only alternative is to use gentle pressure with your fingers to try to pop the (metal) ball out of the (hard plastic) socket - i managed to break both the sockets (1 in each lamp unit) when i did mine and ended up using superglue to repair them for the reassembly.

Adjusting lamps can be done reasonably easily - i take it from your photos the lamps are off the car and you haven't previously parked in front of a wall and marked on the wall where your light beams are? (this is how i would have done it). In which case you want firstly adjust the lamps to that both the inner reflectors are the same. Do this by standing above the lamps, looking down at them in turn and eyeing in the gap between the edge of the inner reflector and the glass lens. Now park in a similar manner to above (in front of a wall) and then try to get the beams just below horizontal, pointing forwards (ideally do this at dusk). Err on the side of caution, point them down rather than up if you know what i mean. Once fully dark, take the car to a long straight piece of road with a layby (be very careful as you will have trouble seeing, ideally the layby won't be too far away) and park in line with the kerb. Wait for no oncoming cars and then adjust the beams so that they are pointing as far up the road as possible, but still towards the ground and not up in the air. This should be adequate to get you to the next MOT without dazzling people and yet still be able to see where you are going.
 

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· Registered
mgf
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5,489 Posts
Yeah, it can be tricky - but i know of people who have done it without breaking them, so it can be done. And superglue is a good way of repairing them (at least it worked well for me anyway).

I am not sure the lamp unit is sealed, i know the lens is on a foam gasket, but i thought this was to prevent rattles - i suppose the only way to know for sure is to try it and see what happens. The holes would make it an easier job, with less risk of breaking anything, but getting them in the right place could be an issue without making them oversize. Only potential problems i can see are the lamps misting up (like the TF ones) and maybe water penetration on the lamp electrics (could go rusty?) I don't think the existing plastic cover caps are 100% waterproof though (they don't appear to have a rubber seal as far as i am aware), so i suppose some silicone sealant might do the trick.

How do you fancy being a guinea pig? ;)
 
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