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mgf
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Not strictly for here but I really need your help- just bought a car from ebay because I thought I could make a quick buck- it says it comes with a HPI clear certificate however ive run a HPI on it (ebay charge £6.99-bargain) and it shows as being written off and fully repaired -does this mean its a cat c and his HPI cert claim is a lie.
Thanks
 

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mg_zt_t
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Not strictly for here but I really need your help- just bought a car from ebay because I thought I could make a quick buck- it says it comes with a HPI clear certificate however ive run a HPI on it (ebay charge £6.99-bargain) and it shows as being written off and fully repaired -does this mean its a cat c and his HPI cert claim is a lie.
Thanks
IIRC, Cat C is usually an 'economical' write off. I have bought a Cat C car, had it repaired ( doing much of the costly labour and paint work myself ) and used it for a few years. For various reasons, Insurance Companies appear to 'write off' cars with very little real damage as a few minutes wandering around one of the major car salvage companies will demonstrate.

Again, IIRC, Cat D is a car which is only to be broken for spares.
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Here are the categories:

An explanation of the categories of write-off are listed below:

Category A - A vehicle which should have been totally crushed, including all its spare parts.

Category B - A vehicle from which spare parts may be salvaged, but the bodyshell should have been crushed and the car should never return to the road.

Category C - An extensively damaged vehicle which the insurer has decided not to repair, but which could be repaired and returned to the road.

Category D - A damaged vehicle which the insurer has decided not to repair, but which could be repaired and returned to the road.

Category F - A vehicle damaged by fire, which the insurer has decided not to repair.

Theft - These vehicles have not been recovered and ownership rests with the insurer who made the total loss payment. They are able to repossess the car as soon as it is identified, even if it has been bought innocently.
 
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