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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys,

I've had my cylinder head off for a few weeks now; I'm sorting out some problems (head gasket, bent valves etc), but I don't get much time to work on it.

I was wondering if there's any problems that can arise from leaving the head off for a while?

For example, I've heard that it's a good idea to ocassionally pour some oil into the cylinders and allow it run through to the sump to keep the piston rings from sticking/rusting in place.

Anybody heard about this, or any other things to do to keep my engine in working order while I sort out getting the head back on?

Thanks all,
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
ashy said:
Just tightly pack newspaper or kitchen towel into the bores. This will absorb any moisture.

Errr.... Bores!? Are you talking about about the 'cooling jackets' which run around the outside of the cylinders (front and back), or do you mean in the head itself?

Sorry for my lack of technical terms!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ahh! Right! That would make sense....

Speaking of shoving things into the cylinders, I heard that to avoid the job of new piston rings, be ultra careful not to get anything (carbon deposits etc) down the side of the piston. Is it really THAT crucial? Obviously if Im packing the cylinders, then I need to watch what Im doing if the piston rings are as delicate as all that....
 

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troy.mclure said:
Ahh! Right! That would make sense....

Speaking of shoving things into the cylinders, I heard that to avoid the job of new piston rings, be ultra careful not to get anything (carbon deposits etc) down the side of the piston. Is it really THAT crucial? Obviously if Im packing the cylinders, then I need to watch what Im doing if the piston rings are as delicate as all that....
The last headgasket I did was a mates naffy polo, I had time so I made a skinny card pipe for the vacum and sucked out the bores and cleanded the pistion/bore clearance with parrafin cotton buds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the info guys.

Is there anything I can do to try and 'help' the followers fill up to the right level again? I thought that If they emptied then you had to fill them as best you could, put them back on, get the engine started, and let them sort themselves out.

Admittedly, I havent read the Haynes yet, thats just what I thought the process was.
 

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griffmonster said:
The last headgasket I did was a mates naffy polo, I had time so I made a skinny card pipe for the vacum and sucked out the bores and cleanded the pistion/bore clearance with parrafin cotton buds.
Now that's what I call being thorough..;)

Exposed bores for a few weeks? ... smear vaseline in the bores and wipe clean prior to reassembly. The vaseline will catch any dust-carbon particles that could become dislodged during operations and if you apply a thick coating of vaseline around the gap betwen pistons and bores, that should exclude any unwanted stuff.

For long periods like an engine in store for months, turn engine over by hand occasionally and reapply vaseline. Old Mother Nature will attack those lovely cylinder bores in no time if you don't take measures to stop her .. she's very persistent when trying to reclaim what is rightfully hers.....;)

Even if you are unable to wipe clean away all the vaseline prior to reassembly, within seconds of firing up the engine the small amount of vaseline that is left will melt in the heat and soon disappear.

I stored an engine long term using paper in the bores and Wood Mice moved in and made a cosy nest in two of the bores chewing the paper into a million bits.......:). Paper is a perfect insulator ...
 

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troy.mclure said:
Thanks for all the info guys.

Is there anything I can do to try and 'help' the followers fill up to the right level again? I thought that If they emptied then you had to fill them as best you could, put them back on, get the engine started, and let them sort themselves out.

Admittedly, I havent read the Haynes yet, thats just what I thought the process was.
Provided the oilways are clear, clean and the oil and oil pump is in good shape, those cam followers should fill up within a few minutes of starting. Mine always have and don't be too worried if your nice engine sounds like an aged diesel during that first start up.... the sound can be horrendous at first. One by one the hydraulic followers fill up and then quieten down...If you try to fill them prior to reassembly, you may trap too much in them and then some valves will not fully close and may not clear even after miles of running...

Be interested to hear the experiences of others here with priming hydraulic followers .....

One other thing worth a mention, when I get a used car I change the oil and filter as soon as I can irrespective of what the previous owner tells me is in it and when the last change was. I like to try and make a certainty of things. I now use Diesel Engine oil for that first oil change in my ownership and I find that Diesel Engine Oil flushing "treatment" can improve the engine in many ways, not least smoother and quieter running cam followers..

For the benefit of those uncertain why this treatment can be beneficial, Diesel engine oil is identical to regular oil with additional slower acting detergents which effectively clear the varnish and sludge built up in engines once they've chalked up a good mileage. The best bit is that when you do the second change, the filthy old Diesel oil shows its done the job and the fresh regular 10-40 semi-synthetic stays transparent and clear for at least a 1000 miles after that second oil Change. Without the Diesel oil treatment, the fresh oil invariably becomes discloured from contaminants left in the engine within 100 miles.

Those observations convince me the treatment is beneficial and many other owners have confirmed the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Very interesting that. I'm going to be filling up the oil, and changing the filter soon, and that's something to keep in mind. Mines done over 100k now and I'm becoming ever more aware of how important good lubrication and engine clenliness can be.

Thanks for the info
 

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MGJohn said:
Be interested to hear the experiences of others here with priming hydraulic followers .....
On the last two K-Series heads I've rebuilt, I used a small syringe to force new oil into each follower. Without the needle it is a close fit to the oil hole on the follower. The old oil comes out around the valve inside.
Both engines fired up first twist and had no tappet noise.
 

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I don't think it's necessary to fill the followers. When I did the gasket on my K I had them out for a few days. Most of the oil had already drained out.
The car started first time after rebuild.

Put 16 new followers in last week. Didn't prefill just popped 'em in as they were. Again she started instantly. Sounded like a bag of spanners for a good 5 minutes and then after 15 minutes was pretty quiet.
 

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ashy said:
I don't think it's necessary to fill the followers. When I did the gasket on my K I had them out for a few days. Most of the oil had already drained out.
The car started first time after rebuild.

Put 16 new followers in last week. Didn't prefill just popped 'em in as they were. Again she started instantly. Sounded like a bag of spanners for a good 5 minutes and then after 15 minutes was pretty quiet.
same here when I did mine.Although I disabled the ignition and removed the injector conectors and cranked it first to build oil pressure then when the oil lamp went out I readied it for real and started first time all be it like a perkins diesel for 5 mins!
 
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