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mg_tf
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Discussion Starter #1
I probably know the answer to this before I ask but anyway, I replaced the cambelt water pump and underfloor s/steel pipes last summer. There was also an oil leak that had made a considerable mess under the engine, whilst, in the throes of the cambelt change, I also noticed that the cam cover gasket was leaking so replaced that at the same time. I did notice that inside the cambelt cover there was evidence of oil and hoped it was just seepage from the cam cover, I had bought camshaft seals just in case but obviously didn’t want to overdo what was my first belt change on this car.
So, to cut to the chase the there is still a leak and it seems evident that the exhaust side camshaft seal is leaking.
  • Do I replace just the leaking seal or is it good practice to replace both as I’m in there?
  • Do I use an oil stop additive such as Wynns Engine Oil Stop leak as it isn’t a stream of oil just an annoying drip?
I sort of think snake oil ideas are just that and the only true solution is to repair but at the moment I just haven’t conjured up the enthusiasm to remove belt etc.
 

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Personally I would do both. On the oil stop additive, I am not a great fan of 'temporary/quick fix' measures. I think doing a proper job is best - yes it is a pain but the satisfaction of knowing that you did it right afterwards far exceeds the pain.
 

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mg_tf
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I believe thst Oil stop additives work by swelling the seal rubber and therefore will effect all the seals it comes in contact with. Will probably result in a short term fix but could lead to bigger issues down the line. Personally I would replace the seals, but I suspect you knew that would be what you would end up doing.
 

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mg_tf
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Discussion Starter #4
I believe thst Oil stop additives work by swelling the seal rubber and therefore will effect all the seals it comes in contact with. Will probably result in a short term fix but could lead to bigger issues down the line. Personally I would replace the seals, but I suspect you knew that would be what you would end up doing.
Hi Luke

I have never been a fan of magic in a can fix as it always seems to just put off what needs doing today until a time when everything goes wrong.

After 35yrs in mechanical engineering, I do subscribe to the renew rather than bodge up. Whilst my enthusiasm is currently not as Id hoped it would be, after a long conversation with a couple of mechanic friends who said that Wynns Engine Oil Stop leak was a good solution to those irritating drips that crop up.

My post I suppose hoped someone who had used such a product and could give some honest feedback. I know some of these magic potions are indeed jaw-dropping when you see them demonstrated but can be less than all right after you bought it. In concluding if the weather decides to brighten up now I have a week off think I better dust the tools off again.
 

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Well, you’re unlucky it’s the cam belt side, because changing the seals on the other side is a doddle in comparison. My experience (on the easy side) was the oil poured out once it started to fail. Didn’t use any products, so can’t help you there. ..

 

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mg_tf
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Discussion Starter #6
Well luck and me are strange fellows most times, so I sort of take it as normal that its the harder side. However, in some ways, I did suspect it last year when replacing the belt and water pump etc. But was concerned that refilling the coolant would be a spectacular failure.
I had never used a vacuum filling system before but turned out an absolute doddle, so if you have a compressor it's well worth spending £20 or so on one of the many systems you find on auction sites.
At the moment its not a slick im leaving more a drip or three when i park up but you know everybody and their dog tells you about it.
 
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