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MG ZR 160 (Mk1), MG ZS 180 (Mk2)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,
I've got a bit of a different question for this forum. Have the petrol engines that are being used/produced by SAIC MGs still anything to do with the original Rover K Series engines (K18 or KV6), i.e., have been developed on the basis thereof.I read somewhere that the NV6 engine is basically a KV6 but not sure if many of these are still being produce today.

Otherwise put, do these engines still have any commercial value to SAIC or are they just stuff for the archives?

Wasn't sure if this question was more fitting for the pre or post 2005 area of this forum.

Cheers.
 

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'06 MG ZR +120 (HQM) '04 MG ZR 105 (IAB)
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Short answer - No.

Long answer - No, nothing at all, at least as far as the non-V6 engines go.

The only four cylinder K series based engines used by SAIC was their reverse engineered and modified version used in the Roewe 750, and later versions of this (known as the Kavachi or TCI-Tech) were used in the MG6.

The relaunched Chinese built MG TF and the MG3SW used a less changed version of the K series and known as the N series.

More recent cars have used newly developed engines engineered within SAIC (initially by their development division SMTC at Longbridge).
 

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MG ZR 160 (Mk1), MG ZS 180 (Mk2)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Short answer - No.

Long answer - No, nothing at all, at least as far as the non-V6 engines go.

The only four cylinder K series based engines used by SAIC was their reverse engineered and modified version used in the Roewe 750, and later versions of this (known as the Kavachi or TCI-Tech) were used in the MG6.

The relaunched Chinese built MG TF and the MG3SW used a less changed version of the K series and known as the N series.

More recent cars have used newly developed engines engineered within SAIC (initially by their development division SMTC at Longbridge).
Thanks a lot for the answer. Is the N Series still being produced and what about the KV6, I would assume that the KV6 does fit the "going electric" vibe the least?

I am genuinely curious about the Restomod trend, and more generally the legal technicalities surrounding it. I would assume car brands are more likely to license intellectual property if that intellectual property is no longer used.
 

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Short answer - No.

Long answer - No, nothing at all, at least as far as the non-V6 engines go.

The only four cylinder K series based engines used by SAIC was their reverse engineered and modified version used in the Roewe 750, and later versions of this (known as the Kavachi or TCI-Tech) were used in the MG6.

The relaunched Chinese built MG TF and the MG3SW used a less changed version of the K series and known as the N series.

More recent cars have used newly developed engines engineered within SAIC (initially by their development division SMTC at Longbridge).
The MG3s sold in the UK have all used a small engine co-designed by GM and SAIC. Some versions of the engine were also used in the Vauxhall Opel range too.
 

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'06 MG ZR +120 (HQM) '04 MG ZR 105 (IAB)
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The MG3s sold in the UK have all used a small engine co-designed by GM and SAIC. Some versions of the engine were also used in the Vauxhall Opel range too.
My post referred to the engine of the MG3SW, which was the Nanjing version of the Rover Streetwise, and was never sold in the UK. It used the revised 'N' series version of the Rover K series as stated.

My understanding was that initially the engines for the SAIC/MG Motor MG3 were evolved from the 'New Small Engine' programme that was started within Ricardo2010/SMTC.
 

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What Man in the car says. Nothing now. The last connection was the MG6 petrol, which stopped being imported in 2013/14. Despite what some people think of Chinese engineering, they managed to rework the K series into a very reliable unit, something neither Rover or BMW seemed keen to do. Ironically the first K Series engines were also pretty trouble free. So Rover managed to not only mess up their own otherwise great engine, they failed to fix the problems they engineerd into it during the production run!
 

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My post referred to the engine of the MG3SW, which was the Nanjing version of the Rover Streetwise, and was never sold in the UK. It used the revised 'N' series version of the Rover K series as stated.

My understanding was that initially the engines for the SAIC/MG Motor MG3 were evolved from the 'New Small Engine' programme that was started within Ricardo2010/SMTC.
Just wanted to highlight that GM claims co-credit for the engine. Future Chevrolets to Benefit from Small Gas Engine Family
 
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