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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just suffered from placing too much faith in BBC Weather App, or too much blind optimism: take your pick.
The result was coming out of the Honiton Supermarket to find a heavy rain shower had started. Ran to the TF pushing my trolley full of groceries. Park trolley where it cannot escape downhill, unlock TF and raise hood in double quick time.

Then the REAL problem started: I realised that as usual, I had driven to the supermarket with driver's window fully down, (reduces backdraft, even with my "new" (Second=hand) windstop fitted.

Switched ignition on, raised window with door still open (did not want to sit on a wet seat, + shopping getting wet and still had to be put-away in boot.) You have guessed by now that the window went up beyond normal top position, and would not go down.

No help in my usual "First Resort" of Roger Parker's books, so consulted this site. (Searched "Window Stuck" on F/TF forum)

BIG Thank-you to MGFNorway. His explanation of how to cure this problem is EXCELLENT! but:
1 correction.
His photo, indicating where the rear access hole for the REAR bolt holding the window to the lift mechanism is wrong, see below.
Vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Trunk Grille


Correct holes are circled green, the only error in MGFNorway's description is the one I have shown in RED.

I AM IN NO SENSE CRITICSISING THE ORIGINAL POST, IT SAVED ME MASSES OF TIME!

I am posting this quick message just to help anyone else who has the same problem.

Hope MGFNorway still has his F or TF and reads this message.
I was pleasantly surprised to find that the stop attached to the window was (as far as I can see) undamaged, see below:
Automotive tire Camera accessory Gas Automotive wheel system Wood


I have turned it though 180 degrees, as recommended, just to move the wear point.

The window winding mechanism is moving freely, so no collateral damage, so after I have taken the opportunity to lubricate tracks etc. with Lithium grease, reassembly will happen tomorrow. Watching F1 on telly (what a RACE!!!!) and cooking dinner kept me away from completing the job today.
 

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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have now completed the repair after a lot of hassle, so I can add a "do not do what I did" post + I NOW know what is accessed from the hole circled in RED on my previous post, and (hopefully) what was rattling inside my door on rough roads and whenever I closed the drivers door.

Firstly: the don't do THIS:
I wiggled the window back into (what I believed) was the right position, ready for bolting-up to the lifting mechanism. That mechanism has to be about half-lowered to give room to get the black plastic stop on the glass behind & below the stop fixed to the inner door.

Having raised the assembly carefully back to where the two holes (green in the picture) allow access, I Moved the window fully forward into the short groove, which I WRONGLY assumed would put the glass in the "right" position fore-and-aft.

I then fully tightened (BAD MISTAKE) the bolts, tried lowering the window (no problem), then tried raising it carefully.

The "carefully" bit saved me. There must be some "guide groove" or similar obstruction near the hinge-end of the door. I had clearly adjusted/positioned the glass too far forward, and it started to "rear-up" at the back, while NOT moving up at the front, as I tried to raise the glass to it's closed (fully-up) position.

I then had to lower the assembly again until could line-up each bolt with a point of access lower down.

Before I replaced the glass, I had lubricated all joints and (visible) guide rail, and while doing this, I noticed a bolt and photographed it:
Bumper Electrical wiring Automotive tire Gas Automotive exterior


I know that I had never undone any bolt of that size in the door, and I had noticed a loud rattle on any bumpy roads, so I am sure these parts (bolt, blue plastic sheath, which should wrap around bottom edge of glass and the out-of-focus grey lump, which was actually the component below), had been rattling around in the bottom of the door since I bought the car. I have a servicing invoice (November 2005 vintage) from the Rover Dealer who sold the car in 2002 which lists, amongst other standard servicing jobs: "lubricate window channels, OS". I suspect that they sort-of did this job, but did not bother/forgot to re-attach the bolt, blue plastic sheath this rear guide assembly.
Auto part Metal Event Still life photography


These parts re-assembled and fitted are shown below. The window now glides fully up and down smoothly, and Hopefully, no more rattling noises from the driver's door!
Door Motor vehicle Bumper Fixture Door handle


With hindsight, I should have searched and read the workshop manual, as well as searching this site for help. Lesson learned:whistle:
 

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Starlight Silver MG TF 135
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158 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Believe it or not, the brown areas are some kind of rust-inhibiting wax or thick grease (possibly very old Waxoyl??), NOT rust. The Blue plastic sheath was stuck on this grease to the outer skin of the door, and one side of the heavy casting which forms the guide was very stick with this greasy stuff, so I cleaned it, carefully, leaving grease on the sliding surfaces.

When I first took off the door card to try to find the source of rattle, (when it did not occur to me to search for large lumps of metal on the bottom of the door), I was also intending to inject Waxoyl, but decided that the job had already been done. See my comment June 27 2021 under my Profile, which reads:

"2 Months in to TF ownership and I have learned a lot from the MG-Rover Forum. The men at Longbridge seemed to have already sprayed waxoyl or similar waxy stuff into bottom part of door, so no signs of rust there!"


I also sprayed waxoyl into the sills, but took pictures first, to show a future buyer how good those areas were in 2021.
Tire Automotive tire Automotive lighting Wheel Tread

Rear wheel arch above, inside sill below
Automotive tire Automotive design Motor vehicle Hood Automotive exterior


There seemed to be traces of the Waxoyl-like stuff in there, but to my mind, not nearly enough or in the right places, so those areas are now well Waxoyled.
 
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