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Discussion Starter #1
I’m a newbie here and only discovered your site today, so firstly I’d like to say how good it is and that I’m very impressed with the extremely helpful & knowledgeable answers given in the forums.



Hopefully one of you will be able to answer a couple of simple questions I have:



Rover 214 16k series 1994

The head is coming for a head gasket change (coolant in expansion tank is now becoming very oily).

I’ve not done a gasket change on these engines before, but I understand that I line-up the timing mark on the crankshaft and make sure the inlet/exhaust timing marks on the 2 camshaft sprockets line up correctly together.

The cam belt has to be removed and obviously the tool for locking the camshaft sprockets can’t be used because the sprockets need to be removed before the head can be lifted off the block, so I was wondering:-


1) After removing the cam belt & camshaft sprockets, how much are the camshafts likely to rotate due the pressure of the valve springs?

2) When the head is placed back on the block and the sprockets reinstalled onto the camshafts, how easy is it (and what’s the best way) to rotate the camshafts so that the inlet/exhaust camshaft timing marks can realign correctly, before I refit the (new) cam belt?



Thanks for any answers
 

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garyb said:
The cam belt has to be removed and obviously the tool for locking the camshaft sprockets can’t be used because the sprockets need to be removed before the head can be lifted off the block
The tool made by Draper or Lazer does lock the wheels so that you can remove the cambelt with the wheels left in-place; the wheels don't usualy need to come off for HG replacement.

Haynes or the 'RAVE' manual will advise how to re-align, but done correctly, you should only need to check alignment rather than adjust for alignment.

Cheers
 

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Yup, you don't have to remove the sprockets. Don't make life more difficult for yourself! Haynes or RAVE are probably the best bets to look at for step by step info.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your replies.

I’ve looked at the Haynes manual and on page 2A.17 section 13 it actually says:

Cylinder head Removal:
  • …..
  • Remove camshaft sprockets.
From what I can see, the camshafts pass through two large holes in the inner cam belt cover, which stops the head being lifted from the block. To overcome this, the camshaft sprockets should be removed (as per Haynes manual instruction) then the inner cam belt cover pulled forward so that the two large holes are out of the way of the camshafts. Once the camshafts are free from the two holes in the inner cover, the head can be lifted.

Am I reading this wrong?

And could you please give me some info on the RAVE manual because I’ve not come across that before.

Thanks a lot.
 

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garyb said:
Thanks for your replies.

I’ve looked at the Haynes manual and on page 2A.17 section 13 it actually says:

[/list]From what I can see, the camshafts pass through two large holes in the inner cam belt cover, which stops the head being lifted from the block. To overcome this, the camshaft sprockets should be removed (as per Haynes manual instruction) then the inner cam belt cover pulled forward so that the two large holes are out of the way of the camshafts. Once the camshafts are free from the two holes in the inner cover, the head can be lifted.

Am I reading this wrong?

And could you please give me some info on the RAVE manual because I’ve not come across that before.

Thanks a lot.
nah you are right (or Haynes is :lol: for once).
 

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putting spockets on and off is easy enough - just make sure they go back on the right way around

also loosen the bolts before removing the cambelt - you will only curse yourself afterwards....
 

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Use the 8mm bolts behind the camwheels to aid locking the wheels, use a socket and small entension to do so.


Mark the camwheels inlet and exhaust and mark the two timing marks that align and also the position of the roll pins in relation to the sprockets.

That way, there is no muddling it up - the sprockets will fit the cams in two positions......fun if you get it worng!
 
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